Utah Administrative Code

The Utah Administrative Code is the body of all effective administrative rules as compiled and organized by the Division of Administrative Rules (see Subsection 63G-3-102(5); see also Sections 63G-3-701 and 702).

NOTE: For a list of rules that have been made effective since October 1, 2019, please see the codification segue page.

NOTE TO RULEFILING AGENCIES: Use the RTF version for submitting rule changes.


R614. Labor Commission, Occupational Safety and Health.

Rule R614-1. General Provisions.

As in effect on October 1, 2019

Table of Contents

R614-1-1. Authority.

A. These rules and all subsequent revisions as approved and promulgated by the Labor Commission, Utah Occupational Safety and Health Division, are authorized pursuant to Title 34A, Chapter 6, Utah Occupational Safety and Health Act.

B. The intent and purpose of this chapter is stated in Section 34A-6-202 of the Act.

C. In accordance with legislative intent these rules provide for the safety and health of workers and for the administration of this chapter by the Utah Occupational Safety and Health Division of the Labor Commission.

R614-1-2. Scope.

These rules consist of the administrative procedures of the Utah Occupational Safety and Health Division, incorporating by reference applicable federal standards from 29 CFR 1904, 1908, 1910 and 1926, and the Utah initiated occupational safety and health standards found in Utah Administrative Code R614-1 through R614-7.

R614-1-3. Definitions.

A. "Access" means the right and opportunity to examine and copy.

B. "Act" means the Utah Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1973.

C. "Administrator" means the director of the Division.

D. "Amendment" means such modification or change in a code, standard, rule, or order intended for universal or general application.

E. "Analysis using exposure or medical records" means any compilation of data, or any research, statistical or other study based at least in part on information collected from individual employee exposure or medical records or information collected from health insurance claims records, provided that either the analysis has been reported to the employer or no further work is currently being done by the person responsible for preparing the analysis.

F. "Commission" means the Utah Labor Commission.

G. "Days" means calendar days, including Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays. The day of receipt of any notice shall not be included, and the last day of any time frame shall be included. If the last day of any time period is a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday, the period continues to run until the end of the next day that is not a Saturday, Sunday or legal holiday.

H. "Designated representative" means any individual or organization to whom an employee gives written authorization to exercise a right of access. For the purpose of access to employee exposure records and analyses using exposure or medical records, a recognized or certified collective bargaining agent shall be treated automatically as a designated representative without regard to written employee authorization.

I. "Division" means the Utah Occupational Safety and Health Division (UOSH) within the Commission.

J. "Employee" includes any person suffered or permitted to work by an employer.

1. For Medical Records: "Employee" means a current employee, a former employee, or an employee being assigned or transferred to work where there will be exposure to toxic substances or harmful physical agents. In the case of deceased or legally incapacitated employee, the employee's legal representative may directly exercise all the employee's rights under this section.

K. "Employee exposure record" means a record containing any of the following kinds of information concerning employee exposure to toxic substances or harmful physical agents:

1. Environmental (workplace) monitoring or measuring, including personal, area, grab, wipe, or other form of sampling, as well as related collection and analytical methodologies, calculations, and other background data relevant to interpretations of the results obtained;

2. Biological monitoring results which directly assess the absorption of a substance or agent by body systems (e.g., the level of a chemical in the blood, urine, breath, hair, fingernails, etc.) but not including results which assess the biological effect of a substance or agent;

3. Safety data sheets; or

4. In the absence of the above, any other record which reveals the identity (e.g., chemical, common, or trade name) of a toxic substance or harmful physical agent.

L. Employee medical record

1. "Employee medical record" means a record concerning the health status of an employee which is made or maintained by a physician, nurse, or other health care personnel, or technician including:

a. Medical and employment questionnaires or histories (including job description and occupational exposures);

b. The results of medical examinations (pre-employment, pre-assignment, periodic, or episodic) and laboratory tests (including X-ray examinations and all biological monitoring);

c. Medical opinions, diagnoses, progress notes, and recommendations;

d. Descriptions of treatments and prescriptions; and

e. Employee medical complaints.

2. "Employee medical record" does not include the following:

a. Physical specimens (e.g., blood or urine samples) which are routinely discarded as a part of normal medical practice, and not required to be maintained by other legal requirements;

b. Records concerning health insurance claims if maintained separately from the employer's medical program and its records, and not accessible to the employer by employee name or other direct personal identifier (e.g., social security number, payroll number, etc.); or

c. Records concerning voluntary employee assistance programs (alcohol, drug abuse, or personal counseling programs) if maintained separately from the employer's medical program and its records.

M. "Employer" means:

1. The state;

2. Each county, city, town, and school district in the state; and

3. Every person, firm, and private corporation, including public utilities, having one or more workers or operatives regularly employed in the same business, or in or about the same establishment, under any contract of hire.

4. For medical records: "Employer" means a current employer, a former employer, or a successor employer.

N. "Establishment" means a single physical location where business is conducted or where services or industrial operations are performed. (For example: A factory, mill, store, hotel, restaurant, movie theater, farm, ranch, bank, sales office, warehouse, or central administrative office.) Where distinctly separate activities are performed at a single physical location (such as contract construction activities from the same physical location as a lumber yard), each activity shall be treated as a separate physical establishment, and separate notices shall be posted in each establishment to the extent that such notices have been furnished by the Administrator.

O. "Exposure" or "exposed" means that an employee is subjected to a toxic substance or harmful physical agent in the course of employment through any route of entry (inhalation, ingestion, skin contact or absorption, etc.) and includes past exposure and potential (e.g., accidental or possible) exposure, but does not include situations where the employer can demonstrate that the toxic substance or harmful physical agent is not used, handled, stored, generated, or present in the workplace in any manner different from typical non-occupational situations.

P. "Hearing" means a proceeding conducted by the commission.

Q. "Imminent danger" means a danger exists which reasonably could be expected to cause an occupational disease, death, or serious physical harm immediately, or before the danger could be eliminated through enforcement procedures under this chapter.

R. "Inspection" means any inspection of an employer's factory, plant, establishment, construction site, or other area, workplace or environment where work is performed by an employee of an employer, and includes any inspection conducted pursuant to a complaint filed under R614-1-6.K.1. and 3., any re-inspection, follow-up inspection, accident investigation or other inspection conducted under Section 34A-6-301 of the Act.

S. "National consensus standard" means any occupational safety and health standard or modification:

1. Adopted by a nationally recognized standards-producing organization under procedures where it can be determined by the administrator and division that persons interested and affected by the standard have reached substantial agreement on its adoption;

2. Formulated in a manner which affords an opportunity for diverse views to be considered; and

3. Designated as such a standard by the Secretary of the United States Department of Labor.

T. "Person" means the general public, one or more individuals, partnerships, associations, corporations, legal representatives, trustees, receivers, and the state and its political subdivisions.

U. "Publish" means publication in accordance with Title 63G, Chapter 3, Utah Administrative Rulemaking Act.

V. "Record" means any item, collection, or grouping of information regardless of the form or process by which it is maintained (e.g., paper document, microfiche, microfilm, X-ray film, or automated data processing.)

W. "Safety and Health Officer" means a person authorized by the Division to conduct inspections.

X. "Secretary" means the Secretary of the United States Department of Labor.

Y. "Specific written consent" means written authorization containing the following:

1. The name and signature of the employee authorizing the release of medical information;

2. The date of the written authorization;

3. The name of the individual or organization that is authorized to release the medical information;

4. The name of the designated representative (individual or organization) that is authorized to receive the released information;

5. A general description of the medical information that is authorized to be released;

6. A general description of the purpose for the release of medical information; and

7. A date or condition upon which the written authorization will expire (if less than one year).

8. A written authorization does not operate to authorize the release of medical information not in existence on the date of written authorization, unless this is expressly authorized, and does not operate for more than one year from the date of written authorization.

9. A written authorization may be revoked in writing prospectively at any time.

Z. "Standard" means an occupational health and safety standard or group of standards which requires conditions, or the adoption or use of one or more practices, means, methods, operations, or processes, reasonably necessary to provide safety and healthful employment and places of employment.

AA. "Toxic substance" or "harmful physical agent" means any chemical substance, biological agent (bacteria, virus, fungus, etc.) or physical stress (noise, heat, cold, vibration, repetitive motion, ionizing and non-ionizing radiation, hypo and hyperbaric pressure, etc) which:

1. Is regulated by any Federal law or rule due to a hazard to health;

2. Is listed in the latest printed edition of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances (RTECS) (See R614-1-12B);

3. Has yielded positive evidence of an acute or chronic health hazard in human, animal, or other biological testing conducted by, or known to the employer; or

4. Has a material safety data sheet available to the employer indicating that the material may pose a hazard to human health.

BB. "Variance" means a special, limited modification or change in the code or standard applicable to the particular establishment of the employer or person petitioning for the modification or change.

CC. "Workplace" means any place of employment.

R614-1-4. Incorporation of Federal Standards.

A. The following federal occupational safety and health standards are hereby incorporated:

1. 29 CFR 1904, July 1, 2017, is incorporated by reference, except 29 CFR 1904.36 and the workplace fatality, injury and illness reporting requirements found in 29 CFR 1904.1, 1904.2, 1904.7 and 1904.39. Workplace fatalities, injuries and illnesses shall be reported pursuant to the more specific Utah standards in Utah Code Ann. Subsection 34A-6-301(3)(b)(2) and the Utah Administrative Code R614-1-5(C)(1).

2. 29 CFR 1908, July 1, 2015, is incorporated by reference.

3. 29 CFR 1910.6 and 1910.21 through the end part of 1910, July 1, 2017, are incorporated by reference, except 29 CFR 1910.1024.

4. 29 CFR 1926.6 and 1926.20 through the end of part 1926, of the July 1, 2017, edition are incorporated by reference, except 29 CFR 1926.1124.

R614-1-5. Adoption and Extension of Established Federal Safety Standards and State of Utah General Safety Orders.

A. Scope and Purpose.

1. The provisions of this rule adopt and extend the applicability of: (1) established Federal Safety Standards, (2) R614, and (3) Workers' Compensation Coverage, as in effect July 1, 1973 and subsequent revisions, with respect to every employer, employee and employment within the boundaries of the State of Utah, covered by the Utah Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1973.

2. All standards and rules including emergency and/or temporary, promulgated under the Federal Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 shall be accepted as part of the Standards, Rules and Regulations under the Utah Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1973, unless specifically revoked or deleted.

3. All employers will provide workers' compensation benefits as required in Section 34A-2-201.

4. Any person, firm, company, corporation or association employing minors must comply fully with all orders and standards of the Labor Division of the Commission. UOSH standards shall prevail in cases of conflict.

B. Construction Work.

Federal Standards, 29 CFR 1926 and selected applicable sections of R614 are accepted covering every employer and place of employment of every employee engaged in construction work of:

1. New construction and building;

2. Remodeling, alteration and repair;

3. Decorating and painting;

4. Demolition; and

5. Transmission and distribution lines and equipment erection, alteration, conversion or improvement.

C. Reporting Requirements.

1. Each employer shall within 8 hours of occurrence, notify the Division of Utah Occupational Safety and Health of the Commission of any work-related fatalities, of any disabling, serious, or significant injury and of any occupational disease incident. Call (801) 530-6901.

2. Tools, equipment, materials or other evidence that might pertain to the cause of such accident shall not be removed or destroyed until so authorized by the Labor commission or one of its Compliance Officers.

3. Each employer shall investigate or cause to be investigated all work-related injuries and occupational diseases and any sudden or unusual occurrence or change of conditions that pose an unsafe or unhealthful exposure to employees.

4. Each employer shall file a report with the Commission within seven days after the occurrence of an injury or occupational disease, after the employers' first knowledge of the occurrence, or after the employee's notification of the same, on forms prescribed by the Commission, of any work-related fatality or any work-related injury or occupational disease resulting in medical treatment, loss of consciousness or loss of work, restriction of work, or transfer to another job. Each employer shall file a subsequent report with the Commission of any previously reported injury or occupational disease that later resulted in death. The subsequent report shall be filed with the Commission within seven days following the death or the employer's first knowledge or notification of the death. No report is required for minor injuries, such as cuts or scratches that require first-aid treatment only, unless the treating physician files, or is required to file the physician's initial report of work injury or occupational disease with the Commission. Also, no report is required for occupational disease which manifest after the employee is no longer employed by the employer with which the exposure occurred, or where the employer is not aware of an exposure occasioned by the employment which results in an occupational disease as defined by Section 34A-3-103.

5. Each employer shall provide the employee with a copy of the report submitted to the Commission. The employer shall also provide the employee with a statement, as prepared by the Commission, of his rights and responsibilities related to the industrial injury or occupational disease.

6. Each employer shall maintain a record in a manner prescribed by the Commission of all work-related injuries and all occupational disease resulting in medical treatment, loss of consciousness, loss of work, restriction or work, or transfer to another job.

7. No person shall remove, displace, destroy, or carry away any safety devices or safeguards provided for use in any place of employment, or interfere in any way with the use thereof by other persons, or interfere in any method or process adopted for the protection of employees. No employee shall refuse or neglect to follow and obey reasonable orders that are issued for the protection of health, life, safety, and welfare of employees.

D. Employer, Employee Responsibility.

1. It shall be the duty and responsibility of any employee upon entering his or her place of employment, to examine carefully such working place and ascertain if the place is safe, if the tools and equipment can be used with safety, and if the work can be performed safely. After such examination, it shall be the duty of the employee to make the place, tools, or equipment safe. If this cannot be done, then it becomes his or her duty to immediately report the unsafe place, tools, equipment, or conditions to the foreman or supervisor.

2. Employees must comply with all safety rules of their employer and with all the Rules and Regulations promulgated by UOSH which are applicable to their type of employment.

3. Management shall inspect or designate a competent person or persons to inspect frequently for unsafe conditions and practices, defective equipment and materials, and where such conditions are found to take appropriate action to correct such conditions immediately.

4. Supervisory personnel shall enforce safety regulations and issue such rules as may be necessary to safeguard the health and lives of employees. They shall warn all employees of any dangerous condition and permit no one to work in an unsafe place, except for the purpose of making it safe.

E. General Safety Requirements.

1. Where there is a risk of injury from hair entanglement in moving parts of machinery, employees shall confine their hair to eliminate the hazard.

2. Body protection: Clothing which is appropriate for the work being done should be worn. Loose sleeves, tails, ties, lapels, cuffs, or similar garments which can become entangled in moving machinery shall not be worn where an entanglement hazard exists. Clothing saturated or impregnated with flammable liquids, corrosive substances, irritant, oxidizing agents or other toxic materials shall be removed and shall not be worn until properly cleaned.

3. General. Wrist watches, rings, or other jewelry shall not be worn on the job where they constitute a safety hazard.

4. Safety Committees. It is recommended that a safety committee comprised of management and employee representatives be established. The committee or the individual member of the committee shall not assume the responsibility of management to maintain and conduct a safe operation. The duties of the committee should be outlined by management, and may include such items as reviewing the use of safety apparel, recommending action to correct unsafe conditions, etc.

5. No intoxicated person shall be allowed to go into or loiter around any operation where workers are employed.

6. No employee shall carry intoxicating liquor into a place of employment, except that the place of employment shall be engaged in liquor business and this is a part of his assigned duties.

7. Employees who do not understand or speak the English language shall not be assigned to any duty or place where the lack or partial lack of understanding or speaking English might adversely affect their safety or that of other employees.

8. Good housekeeping is the first law of accident prevention and shall be a primary concern of all supervisors and workers. An excessively littered or dirty work area will not be tolerated as it constitutes an unsafe, hazardous condition of employment.

9. Emergency Posting Required.

a. Good communications are necessary if a fire or disaster situation is to be adequately coped with. A system for alerting and directing employees to safety is an essential step in a safety program.

b. A list of telephone numbers or addresses as may be applicable shall be posted in a conspicuous place so the necessary help can be obtained in case of emergency. This list shall include:

(1) Responsible supervision (superintendent or equivalent)

(2) Doctor

(3) Hospital

(4) Ambulance

(5) Fire Department

(6) Sheriff or Police

10. Lockouts and Tagging.

a. Where there is any possibility of machinery being started or electrical circuits being energized while repairs or maintenance work is being done, the electrical circuits shall be locked open and/or tagged and the employee in charge (the one who places the lock) shall keep the key until the job is completed or he is relieved from the job, such as by shift change or other assignment. If it is expected that the job may be assigned to other workers, he may remove his lock provided the supervisor or other workers apply their lock and tag immediately. Where there is danger of machinery being started or of steam or air creating a hazard to workers while repairs on maintenance work is being done, the employee in charge shall disconnect the lines or lock and tag the main valve closed or blank the line on all steam driven machinery, pressurized lines or lines connected to such equipment if they could create a hazard to workers.

b. After tagging and lockout procedures have been applied, machinery, lines, and equipment shall be checked to insure that they cannot be operated.

c. If locks and tags cannot be applied, conspicuous tags made of nonconducting material and plainly lettered, "EMPLOYEES WORKING" followed by the other appropriate wording, such as "Do not close this switch" shall be used.

d. When in doubt as to procedure, the worker shall consult his supervisor concerning safe procedure.

11. Safety-Type hooks shall be used wherever possible.

12. Emergency Showers, Bubblers, and Eye Washers.

a. Readily accessible, well marked, rapid action safety showers and eye wash facilities must be available in areas where strong acid, caustic or highly oxidizing or irritating chemicals are being handled. (This is not applicable where first aid practices specifically preclude flushing with running water.)

b. Showers should have deluge type heads, easily accessible, plainly marked and controlled by quick opening valves of the type that stay open. The valve handle should be equipped with a pull chain, rope, etc., so the blinded employee will be able to more easily locate the valve control. In addition, it is recommended that the floor platform be so constructed to actuate the quick opening valve. The shower should be capable of supplying large quantities of water under moderately high pressure. Blankets should be located so as to be reasonably accessible to the shower area.

c. All safety equipment should be inspected and tested at regular intervals, preferably daily and especially during freezing weather, to make sure it is in good working condition at all times.

13. Grizzlies Over Chutes, Bins and Tank Openings.

a. Employees shall be furnished with and be required to use approved type safety harnesses and shall be tied off securely so as to suspend him above the level of the product before entering any bin, chute or storage place containing material that might cave or run. Cleaning and barring down in such places shall be started from the top using only bars blunt on one end or having a ring type or D handhold.

b. Employees shall not work on top of material stored or piled above chutes, drawholes or conveyor systems while material is being withdrawn unless protected.

c. Chutes, bins, drawholes and similar openings shall be equipped with grizzlies or other safety devices that will prevent employees from falling into the openings.

d. Bars for grizzly grids shall be so fitted that they will not loosen and slip out of place, and the operator shall not remove a bar temporarily to let large rocks through rather than to break them.

F. All requirements of PSM Standard 29 CFR 1910.119 are hereby extended to include the blister agents, HT, HD, H, Lewisite, and the nerve agents, GA, VX.

R614-1-6. Personal Protective Equipment.

A. When no other method or combination of methods can be provided to prevent employees from becoming exposed to toxic dusts, fumes, gases, flying particles or other objects, dangerous rays or burns from heat, acid, caustic, or any other hazard of a similar nature, the employer must provide each worker with the necessary personal protection equipment, such as respirators, goggles, gas masks, certain types of protective clothing, etc. Provision must also be made to keep all such equipment in good, sanitary working condition at all times.

B. Where there is a risk of injury from hair entanglement in moving parts of machinery, employees shall confine their hair to eliminate the hazard.

C. Except when, in the opinion of the Administrator, their use creates a greater hazard, life lines and safety harnesses shall be provided for and used by workers engaged in window washing, in securing or shifting thrustouts, inspecting or working on overhead machines supporting scaffolds or other high rigging, and on steeply pitched roofs. Similarly, they shall be provided for and used by all exposed to the hazard of falling, and by workmen on poles workers or steel frame construction more than ten (10) feet above solid ground or above a temporary or permanent floor or platform.

D. Every life line and safety harness shall be inspected by the superintendent or his authorized representative and the worker before it is used and at least once a week while continued in use.

E. Wristwatches, rings, or other jewelry shall not be worn on the job where they constitute a safety hazard.

R614-1-7. Inspections, Citations, and Proposed Penalties.

A. The Utah Occupational Safety and Health Act (Title 34A, Chapter 6) requires, that every employer covered under the Act furnish to his employees employment and a place of employment which are free from recognized hazards that are likely to cause death or serious physical harm to his employees. The Act also requires that employers comply with occupational safety and health standards promulgated under the Act, and that employees comply with standards, rules, regulations and orders issued under the Act applicable to employees actions and conduct. The Act authorizes the Utah Occupational Safety and Health Division to conduct inspections, and to issue citations and proposed penalties for alleged violations. The Act, under Section 34A-6-301, also authorizes the Administrator to conduct inspections and to question employers and employees in connection with research and other related activities. The Act contains provisions for adjudication of violations, periods prescribed for the abatement of violations, and proposed penalties by the Labor Commission, if contested by an employer or by an employee or authorized representative of employees, and for a judicial review. The purpose of R614-1-7 is to prescribe rules and general policies for enforcement of the inspection, citations, and proposed penalty provisions of the Act. Where R614-1-7 sets forth general enforcement policies rather than substantive or procedural rules, such policies may be modified in specific circumstances where the Administrator or his designee determines that an alternative course of action would better serve the objectives of the Act.

B. Posting of notices; availability of Act, regulations and applicable standards.

1. Each employer shall post and keep posted notices, to be furnished by the Administrator, informing employees of the protections and obligations provided for in the Act, and that for assistance and information, including copies of the Act and of specific safety and health standards, employees should contact their employer or the office of the Administrator. Such notices shall be posted by the employer in each establishment in a conspicuous place where notices to employees are customarily posted. Each employer shall take steps to insure that such notices are not altered, defaced, or covered by other material.

2. Where employers are engaged in activities which are physically dispersed, such as agriculture, construction, transportation communications, and electric, gas and sanitary services, the notices required shall be posted at the location where employees report each day. In the case of employees who do not usually work at, or report to, a single establishment, such as traveling salesman, technicians, engineers, etc., such notices shall be posted in accordance with the requirements of R614-1-7.Q.

3. Copies of the Act, all regulations published under authority of Section 34A-6-202 and all applicable standards will be available at the office of the Administrator. If an employer has obtained copies of these materials, he shall make them available upon request to any employee or his authorized representative.

4. Any employer failing to comply with the provisions of this Part shall be subject to citation and penalty in accordance with the provisions of Sections 34A-6-302 and 34A-6-307 of the Act.

C. Authority for Inspection.

1. Safety and Health Officers of the Division are authorized to enter without delay and at reasonable times any factory, plant, establishment, construction site, or other area, workplace or environment where work is performed by an employee of an employer; to inspect and investigate during regular working hours and at other reasonable times, and within reasonable limits and in a reasonable manner, any such place of employment, and all pertinent conditions, structures, machines, apparatus, devices, equipment and materials therein; to question privately any employer, owner, operator, agent or employee; and to review records required by the Act and regulations published in R614-1-7 and 8, and other records which are directly related to the purpose of the inspection.

2. Prior to inspecting areas containing information which has been classified as restricted by an agency of the United States Government in the interest of national security, Safety and Health Officers shall obtain the appropriate security clearance.

D. Objection to Inspection.

1. Upon a refusal to permit the Safety and Health Officer, in exercise of his official duties, to enter without delay and at reasonable times any place of employment or any place therein, to inspect, to review records, or to question any employer, owner, operator, agent, or employee, in accordance with R614-1-7.B. and C. or to permit a representative of employees to accompany the Safety and Health Officer during the physical inspection of any workplace in accordance with R614-1-7.G. the Safety and Health Officer shall terminate the inspection or confine the inspection to other areas, conditions, structures, machines, apparatus, devices, equipment, materials, records or interview concerning which no objection is raised.

2. The Safety and Health Officer shall endeavor to ascertain the reason for such refusal, and shall immediately report the refusal and the reason therefor to the Administrator. The Administrator shall take appropriate action, including compulsory process, if necessary.

3. Compulsory process shall be sought in advance of an attempted inspection or investigation if, in the judgment of the Administrator circumstances exist which make such preinspection process desirable or necessary. Some examples of circumstances in which it may be desirable or necessary to seek compulsory process in advance of an attempt to inspect or investigate include (but are not limited to):

a. When the employers past practice either implicitly or explicitly puts the Administrator on notice that a warrantless inspection will not be allowed:

b. When an inspection is scheduled far from the local office and procuring a warrant prior to leaving to conduct the inspection would avoid, in case of refusal of entry, the expenditure of significant time and resources to return to the office, obtain a warrant and return to the work-site;

c. When an inspection includes the use of special equipment or when the presence of an expert or experts is needed in order to properly conduct the inspection, and procuring a warrant prior to an attempt to inspect would alleviate the difficulties or costs encountered in coordinating the availability of such equipment or expert.

4. For purposes of this section, the term compulsory process shall mean the institution of any appropriate action, including ex parte application for an inspection warrant or its equivalent. Ex parte inspection warrants shall be the preferred form of compulsory process in all circumstances where compulsory process is relied upon to seek entry to a workplace under this section.

E. Entry not a Waiver.

Any permission to enter, inspect, review records, or question any person, shall not imply a waiver of any cause of action, citation, or penalty under the Act. Safety and Health Officers are not authorized to grant such waivers.

F. Advance notice of Inspections.

1. Advance notice of inspections may not be given, except in the following instances:

a. In cases of apparent imminent danger, to enable the employer to abate the danger as quickly as possible.

b. In circumstances where the inspection can most effectively be conducted after regular business hours or where special preparations are necessary for an inspection.

c. Where necessary to assure the presence of the employer or representative of the employer and employees or the appropriate personnel needed to aid the inspection; and

d. In other circumstances where the Administrator determines that the giving of advance notice would enhance the probability of an effective and thorough inspection.

2. In the instances described in R614-1-7.F.1., advance notice of inspections may be given only if authorized by the Administrator, except that in cases of imminent danger, advance notice may be given by the Safety and Health Officer without such authorization if the Administrator is not immediately available. Where advance notice is given, it shall be the employer's responsibility to notify the authorized representative of the employees of the inspection, if the identity of such representatives is known to the employer. (See R614-1-7.H.2. as to instances where there is no authorized representative of employees.) Upon the request of the employer, the Safety and Health Officer will inform the authorized representative of employees of the inspection, provided that the employer furnishes the Safety and Health Officer with the identity of such representatives and with such other information as is necessary to enable him promptly to inform such representatives of the inspection. A person who fails to comply with his responsibilities under this paragraph, may be subject to citation and penalty under Sections 34A-6-302 and 34A-6-307 of the Act. Advance notice in any of the instances described in R614-1-7.F. shall not be given more than 24 hours before the inspection is scheduled to be conducted, except in cases of imminent danger and other unusual circumstances.

3. The Act provides in Subsection 34A-6-307(5)(b) conditions for which advanced notice can be given and the penalties for not complying.

G. Conduct of Inspections.

1. Subject to the provisions of R614-1-7.C., inspections shall take place at such times and in such places of employment as the Administrator or the Safety and Health Officer may direct. At the beginning of an inspection, Safety and Health Officers shall present their credentials to the owner, operator, or agent in charge at the establishment; explain the nature and purpose of the inspection; and indicate generally the scope of the inspection and the records specified in R614-1-7.C. which they wish to review. However, such designations of records shall not preclude access to additional records specified in R614-1-7.C.

2. Safety and Health Officers shall have authority to take environmental samples and to take photographs or video recordings related to the purpose of the inspection, employ other reasonable investigative techniques, and question privately any employer, owner, operator, agent or employee of an establishment. (See R614-1-7.I. on trade secrets.) As used herein, the term "employ other reasonable investigative techniques" includes, but is not limited to, the use of devices to measure employee exposures and the attachment of personal sampling equipment such as dosimeters, pumps, badges, and other similar devices to employees in order to monitor their exposures.

3. In taking photographs and samples, Safety and Health Officers shall take reasonable precautions to insure that such actions with flash, spark-producing, or other equipment would not be hazardous. Safety and Health Officers shall comply with all employer safety and health rules and practices at the establishment being inspected, and shall wear and use appropriate protective clothing and equipment.

4. The conduct of inspections shall preclude unreasonable disruption of the operations of the employer's establishment.

5. At the conclusion of an inspection, the Safety and Health Officer shall confer with the employer or his representative and informally advise him of any apparent safety or health violations disclosed by the inspection. During such conference, the employer shall be afforded an opportunity to bring to the attention of the Safety and Health Officer any pertinent information regarding conditions in the workplace.

H. Representative of employers and employees.

1. Safety and Health Officer shall be in charge of inspections and questioning of persons. A representative of the employer and a representative authorized by his employees shall be given an opportunity to accompany the Safety and Health Officer during the physical inspection of any workplace for the purpose of aiding such inspection. A Safety and Health Officer may permit additional employer representative and additional representatives authorized by employees to accompany him where he determines that such additional representatives will further aid the inspection. A different employer and employee representative may accompany the Safety and Health Officer during each phase of an inspection if this will not interfere with the conduct of the inspection.

2. Safety and Health Officers shall have authority to resolve all disputes as to who is the representative authorized by the employer and the employees for purpose of this Part. If there is no authorized representative of employees, or if the Safety and Health Officer is unable to determine with reasonable certainty who is such representative, he shall consult with a reasonable number of employees concerning matters of safety and health in the workplace.

3. The representative(s) authorized by employees shall be an employee(s) of the employer. However, if in the judgment of the Safety and Health Officer, good cause has been shown why accompaniment by a third party who is not an employee of the employer (such as an industrial hygienist or safety engineer) is reasonably necessary to the conduct of an effective and thorough physical inspection of the workplace, such third party may accompany the Safety and Health Officer during the inspection.

4. Safety and Health Officers are authorized to deny the right of accompaniment under this Part to any person whose conduct interferes with a fair and orderly inspection. The right of accompaniment in areas containing trade secrets shall be subject to the provisions of R614-1-7.I.3. With regard to information classified by an agency of the U.S. Government in the interest of national security, only persons authorized to have access to such information may accompany a Safety and Health Officer in areas containing such information.

I. Trade secrets.

1. Section 34A-6-306 of the Act provides provisions for trade secrets.

2. At the commencement of an inspection, the employer may identify areas in the establishment which contain or which might reveal a trade secret. If the Safety and Health Officer has no clear reason to question such identification, information obtained in such areas, including all negatives and prints of photographs, and environmental samples, shall be labeled "confidential-trade secret" and shall not be disclosed except in accordance with the provisions of Section 34A-6-306 of the Act.

3. Upon the request of an employer, any authorized representative of employees under R614-1-7.H. in an area containing trade secrets shall be an employee in that area or an employee authorized by the employer to enter that area. Where there is not such representative or employee, the Safety and Health Officer shall consult with a reasonable number of employees who work in that area concerning matters of safety and health.

J. Consultation with employees.

Safety and Health Officers may consult with employees concerning matters of occupational safety and health to the extent they deem necessary for the conduct of an effective and thorough inspection. During the course of an inspection, any employee shall be afforded an opportunity to bring any violation of the Act which he has reason to believe exists in the workplace to the attention of the Safety and Health Officer.

K. Complaints by employees.

1. Any employee or representative of employees who believe that a violation of the Act exists in any workplace where such employee is employed may request an inspection of such workplace by giving notice of the alleged violation to the Administrator or to a Safety and Health Officer. Any such notice shall be reduced to writing, shall set forth with reasonable particularity the grounds for the notice, and shall be signed by the employee or representative of employees. A copy of the notice shall be provided the employer or his agent by the Administrator or Safety and Health Officer no later than at the time of inspection, except that, upon the request of the person giving such notice, his name and the names of individual employees referred to therein shall not appear in such copy or on any record published, released, or made available by the Administrator.

2. If upon receipt of such notification the Administrator determines that the complaint meets the requirements set forth in R614-1-7.K.1., and that there are reasonable grounds to believe that the alleged violation exists, he shall cause an inspection to be made as soon as practicable. Inspections under this Part shall not be limited to matters referred to in the complaint.

3. Prior to or during any inspection of a workplace, any employee or representative of employees employed in such workplace may notify the Safety and Health Officer, in writing, of any violation of the Act which they have reason to believe exists in such workplace. Any such notice shall comply with requirements of R614-1-7.K.1.

4. Section 34A-6-203 of the Act provides protection for employees while engaged in protected activities.

L. Inspection not warranted; informal review.

1. If the Administrator determines that an inspection is not warranted because there are no reasonable grounds to believe that a violation or danger exists with respect to a complaint under K, he shall notify the complaining party in writing of such determination. The complaining party may obtain review of such determination by submitting a written statement of position with the Administrator. The Administrator, at his discretion, may hold an informal conference in which the complaining party and the employer may orally present their views. After considering all written and oral view presented, the Administrator shall affirm, modify, or reverse the determination of the previous decision and again furnish the complaining party and the employer written notification of his decision and the reasons therefor.

2. If the Administrator determines that an inspection is not warranted because the requirements of R614-1-7.K.1. have not been met, he shall notify the complaining party in writing of such determination. Such determination shall be without prejudice to the filing of a new complaint meeting the requirements of R614-1-7.K.1.

M. Imminent danger.

Whenever a Safety and Health Officer concludes, on the basis of an inspection, that conditions or practices exist in any place of employment which could reasonably be expected to cause death or serious physical harm before the imminence of such danger can be eliminated through the enforcement procedures of the Act, he shall inform the affected employees and employers of the danger, that he is recommending a civil action to restrain such conditions or practices and for other appropriate citations of proposed penalties which may be issued with respect to an imminent danger even though, after being informed of such danger by the Compliance Officer, the employer immediately eliminates the imminence of the danger and initiates steps to abate such danger.

N. Citations.

1. The Administrator shall review the inspection report of the Safety and Health Officer. If, on the basis of the report the Administrator believes that the employer has violated a requirement of Section 34A-6-201 of the Act, of any standard, rule, or order promulgated pursuant to Section 34A-6-202 of the Act, or of any substantive rule published in this chapter, shall issue to the employer a citation. A citation shall be issued even though, after being informed of an alleged violation by the Safety and Health Officer, the employer immediately abates, or initiates steps to abate, such alleged violations. Any citation shall be issued with reasonable promptness after termination of the inspection. No citation may be issued after the expiration of 6 months following the occurrence of any violation.

2. Any citation shall describe with particularity the nature of the alleged violation, including a reference to the provision of the Act, standard, rule, regulations, or order alleged to have been violated. Any citation shall also fix a reasonable time or times for the abatement of the alleged violations.

3. If a citation is issued for an alleged violation in a request for inspection under R614-1-7.K.1. or a notification of violation under R614-1-7.K.3., a copy of the citation shall also be sent to the employee or representative of employees who made such request or notification.

4. Following an inspection, if the Administrator determines that a citation is not warranted with respect to a danger or violation alleged to exist in a request for inspection under R614-1-7.K.1.or a notification of violation under R614-1-7.K.3., the informal review procedures prescribed in R614-1-7.L.1. shall be applicable. After considering all views presented, the Administrator shall either affirm, order a re-inspection, or issue a citation if he believes that the inspection disclosed a violation. The Administrator shall furnish the complaining party and the employer with written notification of his determination and the reasons therefor.

5. Every citation shall state that the issuance of a citation does not constitute a finding that a violation of the Act has occurred unless there is a failure to contest as provided for in the Act or, if contested, unless the citation is affirmed by the Commission.

O. Petitions for modification of abatement date.

1. An employer may file a petition for modification of abatement date when he has made a good faith effort to comply with the abatement requirements of the citation, but such abatement has not been completed because of factors beyond his reasonable control.

2. A petition for modification of abatement date shall be in writing and shall include the following information.

a. All steps taken by the employer, and the dates of such action, in an effort to achieve compliance during the prescribed abatement period.

b. The specific additional abatement time necessary in order to achieve compliance.

c. The reasons such additional time is necessary, including the unavailability, of professional or technical personnel or of materials and equipment, or because necessary construction or alteration of facilities cannot be completed by the original abatement date.

d. All available interim steps being taken to safeguard the employees against the cited hazard during the abatement period.

e. A certification that a copy of the petition has been posted and, if appropriate, served on the authorized representative of affected employees, in accordance with paragraph R614-1-7.O.3.a. and a certification of the date upon which such posting and service was made.

3. A petition for modification of abatement date shall be filed with the Administrator who issued the citation no later than the close of the next working day following the date on which abatement was originally required. A later-filed petition shall be accompanied by the employer's statement of exceptional circumstances explaining the delay.

a. A copy of such petition shall be posted in a conspicuous place where all affected employees will have notice thereof or near such location where the violation occurred. The petition shall remain posted for a period of ten (10) days. Where affected employees are represented by an authorized representative, said representative shall be served with a copy of such petition.

b. Affected employees or their representatives may file an objection in writing to such petition with the aforesaid Administrator. Failure to file such objection within ten (10) working days of the date of posting of such petition or of service upon an authorized representative shall constitute a waiver of any further right to object to said petition.

c. The Administrator or his duly authorized agent shall have authority to approve any petition for modification of abatement date filed pursuant to paragraphs R614-1-7.O.2. and 3. Such uncontested petitions shall become final orders pursuant to Subsection 34A-6-303(1) of the Act.

d. The Administrator or his authorized representative shall not exercise his approval power until the expiration of ten (10) days from the date of the petition was posted or served pursuant to paragraphs R614-1-7.O.3.a. and b. by the employer.

4. Where any petition is objected to by the affected employees, the petition, citation, and any objections shall be forwarded to the Administrator per R614-1-7.O.3.b. Upon receipt the Administrator shall schedule and notify all interested parties of a formal hearing before the Administrator or his authorized representative(s). Minutes of this hearing shall be taken and become public records of the Commission. Within ten (10) days after conclusion of the hearing, a written opinion by the Administrator will be made, with copies to the affected employees or their representatives, the affected employer and to the Commission.

P. Proposed penalties.

1. After, or concurrent with, the issuance of a citation and within a reasonable time after the termination of the inspection, the Administrator shall notify the employer by certified mail or by personal service by the Safety and Health Officer of the proposed penalty under Section 34A-6-307 of the Act, or that no penalty is being proposed. Any notice of proposed penalty shall state that the proposed penalty shall be deemed to be the final order of the Commission and not subject to review by any court or agency unless, within 30 days from the date of receipt of such notice, the employer notifies the Adjudication Division in writing that he intends to contest the citation or the notification of proposed penalty before the Commission.

2. The Administrator shall determine the amount of any proposed penalty, giving due consideration to the appropriateness of the penalty with respect to the size of the business, of the employer being charged, the gravity of the violation, the good faith of the employer, and the history of previous violations, in accordance with the provisions of Section 34A-6-307 of the Act.

3. Appropriate penalties may be proposed with respect to an alleged violation even though after being informed of such alleged violation by the Safety and Health Officer, the employer immediately abates, or initiates steps to abate, such alleged violation. Penalties shall not be proposed for violations which have no direct or immediate relationship to safety or health.

Q. Posting of citations.

1. Upon receipt of any citation under the Act, the employer shall immediately post such citation, or copy thereof, unedited, at or near each place of alleged violation referred to in the citation occurred, except as hereinafter provided. Where, because of the nature of the employer's operations, it is not practicable to post the citation at or near each place of alleged violation, such citation shall be posted, unedited, in a prominent place where it will be readily observable by all affected employees. For example, where employees are engaged in activities which are physically dispersed (see R614-1-7.B.), the citation may be posted at the location to which employees report each day. Where employees do not primarily work at or report to a single location (see R614-1-7.B.2.), the citation must be posted at the location from which the employees commence their activities. The employer shall take steps to ensure that the citation is not altered, defaced, or covered by other material.

2. Each citation or a copy thereof, shall remain posted until the violation has been abated, or for 3 working days which ever is later. The filing by the employer of a notice of intention to contest under R614-1-7.R. shall not affect his posting responsibility unless and until the Commission issues a final order vacating the citation.

3. An employer, to whom a citation has been issued, may post a notice in the same location where such citation is posted indicating that the citation is being contested before the Commission, such notice may explain the reasons for such contest. The employer may also indicate that specified steps have been taken to abate the violation.

4. Any employer failing to comply with the provisions of R614-1-7.Q.1. and 2. shall be subject to citation and penalty in accordance with the provisions of Section 34A-6-307 of the Act.

R. Employer and employee hearings before the Commission.

1. Any employer to whom a citation or notice of proposed penalty has been issued, may under Section 34A-6-303 of the Act, notify the Adjudication Division in writing that the employer intends to contest such citation or proposed penalty before the Commission. Such notice of intention to contest must be received by the Adjudication Division within 30 days of the receipt by the employer of the notice of proposed penalty. Every notice of intention to contest shall specify whether it is directed to the citation or to the proposed penalty, or both. The Adjudication Division shall handle such notice in accordance with the rules of procedures prescribed by the Commission.

2. An employee or representative of employee of an employer to whom a citation has been issued may, under Section 34A-6-303(3) of the Act, file a written notice with the Adjudication Division alleging that the period of time fixed in the citation for the abatement of the violation is unreasonable. Such notice must be received by the Adjudication Division within 30 days of the receipt by the employer of the notice of proposed penalty or notice that no penalty is being proposed. The Adjudication Division shall handle such notice in accordance with the rules of procedure prescribed by the Commission.

S. Failure to correct a violation for which a citation has been issued.

1. If an inspection discloses that an employer has failed to correct an alleged violation for which a citation has been issued within the period permitted for its correction, the Administrator shall notify the employer by certified mail or by personal service by the Safety and Health Officer of such failure and of the additional penalty proposed under Section 34A-6-307 of the Act by reason of such failure. The period for the correction of a violation for which a citation has been issued shall not begin to run until the entry of a final order of the Commission in the case of any review proceedings initiated by the employer in good faith and not solely for delay or avoidance of penalties.

2. Any employer receiving a notification of failure to correct a violation and of proposed additional penalty may, under Section 34A-6-303(3) of the Act, notify the Adjudication Division in writing that he intends to contest such notification or proposed additional penalty before the Commission. Such notice of intention to contest shall be postmarked within 30 days of receipt by the employer of the notification of failure to correct a violation and of proposed additional penalty. The Adjudication Division shall handle such notice in accordance with the rules of procedures prescribed by the Commission.

3. Each notification of failure to correct a violation and of proposed additional penalty shall state that it shall be deemed to be the final order of the Commission and not subject to review by any court or agency unless, within 30 days from the date of receipt of such notification, the employer notifies the Adjudication Division in writing that he intends to contest the notification or the proposed additional penalty before the Commission.

T. Informal conferences.

At the request of an affected employer, employee, or representative of employees, the Administrator may hold an informal conference for the purpose of discussing any issues raised by an inspection, citation, notice of proposed penalty, or notice of intention to contest. The Administrator shall provide in writing the reasons for any settlement of issues at such conferences. If the conference is requested by the employer, an affected employee or his representative shall be afforded an opportunity to participate, at the discretion of the Administrator. If the conference is requested by an employee or representative of employees, the employer shall be afforded an opportunity to participate, at the discretion of the Administrator. Any party may be represented by counsel at such conference. No such conference or request for such conference shall operate as a stay of any 30 day period for filing a notice of intention to contest as prescribed in R614-1-7.R.

U. Multi-Employer worksites.

1. Pursuant to Section 34A-6-201 of the Act, violation of an applicable standard adopted under Section 34A-6-202 of the Act at a multi-employer worksite may result in a citation issued to more than one employer.

2. An employer on a multi-employer worksite may be considered a creating, exposing, correcting, or controlling employer. An employer may be cited should:

a. It meet the definition of a creating employer and be found to have failed to exercise the duty of care required by this Rule for a creating employer: or

b. It meet the definition of an exposing, correcting, or controlling employer and be found to have failed to exercise the duty of care required by this Rule for that category of employer.

c. Even if an employer meets its duty of reasonable care applicable to one category of employer, it may still be cited should it meet the definition of another category of employer and be found to have failed to exercise the duty of care required by this Rule for that category of employer. No employer will be cited for the same violation under multiple categories of employers.

3. Creating Employer. A creating employer is one that created a hazardous condition on the worksite. A creating employer may be cited if:

a. Its own employees are exposed or if the employees of another employer at the site are exposed to this hazard; and

b. The employer did not exercise reasonable care by taking prompt and effective steps to alert employees of other employers of the hazard and to correct or remove the hazard or, if the creating employer does not have the ability or authority to correct or remove the hazard, to notify the controlling or correcting employer of the hazard.

4. Exposing Employer. An exposing employer is one that exposed its own employees to a hazard. If the exposing employer created the hazard, it is citable as the creating employer, not the exposing employer.

a. If the exposing employer did not create the hazard, it may be cited as the exposing employer if:

i. It knew of the hazard or failed to exercise reasonable care to discover the hazard; and

ii. Upon obtaining knowledge of the hazard, it failed to take prompt and reasonable precautions, consistent with its authority on the worksite, to protect its employees.

b. An exposing employer will be deemed to have exercised reasonable care to discover a hazard if it demonstrates that it has regularly and diligently inspected the worksite.

c. If the exposing employer has the authority to correct or remove the hazard, it must correct or remove the hazard with reasonable diligence. If the exposing employer lacks such authority, it may still be cited if:

i. It failed to make a good faith effort to ask the creating and/or controlling employer to correct the hazard;

ii. It failed to inform its employees of the hazard; and

iii. It failed to take reasonable alternative measures, consistent with its authority on the worksite, to protect its employees.

5. Correcting Employer. A correcting employer is one responsible for correcting a hazardous condition, such as installing or maintaining safety and health devices or equipment, or implementing appropriate health and safety procedures. A correcting employer must exercise reasonable care in preventing and discovering hazards and ensure such hazards are corrected in a prompt manner, which shall be determined in light of the scale, nature and pace of the work, and the amount of activity of the worksite.

6. Controlling Employer. A controlling employer is one with general supervisory authority over a worksite. This authority may be established either through contract or practice and includes the authority to correct safety and health violations or require others to do so, but it is separate from the responsibilities and care to be exercised by a correcting employer.

a. A controlling employer will not be cited if it has exercised reasonable care to prevent and detect violations on the worksite. The extent of the measures used by a controlling employer to satisfy this duty, however, is less than the extent required of an employer when protecting its own employees. A controlling employer is not required to inspect for hazards or violations as frequently or to demonstrate the same knowledge of applicable standards or specific trade expertise as the employer under its control.

b. When determining the duty of reasonable care applicable to a controlling employer on a multi-employer worksite, the factors that may be considered include, but are not limited to:

i. The nature of the worksite and industry in which the work is being performed;

ii. The scale, nature and pace of the work, including the pace and frequency at which the worksite hazards change as the work progresses;

iii. The amount of activity at the worksite, including the number of employers under its control and the number of employees working on the worksite;

iv. The implementation and monitoring of safety and health precautions for the entire worksite requiring that other employers on the worksite comply with their respective obligations and standards of care for the safety of employees, a graduated system of discipline for non-compliant employees and/or employers, regular worksite safety meetings, and when appropriate for atypical hazards, the providing of adequate safety training by employers for atypical hazards present on the worksite; and

v. The frequency of worksite inspections, particularly at the commencement of a project or the commencement of work on the project by other employers that come under its control. As work progresses, the frequency and sufficiency of such inspections shall be determined in relation to other employers' compliance with their respective obligations and standards of care as required by this Rule.

c. When evaluating whether a controlling employer has demonstrated reasonable care in preventing and discovering violations, the following factors, though not inclusive, shall be considered;

i. Whether the controlling employer conducted worksite inspections with sufficient frequency as contemplated by subsection 6(b);

ii. The controlling employer's implementation and monitoring of an effective system for identifying a hazardous condition and promptly notifying employers under its control of the hazard so as to ensure compliance with their respective duties of care under this Rule;

iii. Whether the controlling employer implements a graduated system of discipline for non-compliant employees and/or employers with their respective safety and health requirements;

iv. Whether the controlling employer performs follow-up inspections to ensure hazards are corrected; and

v. Other actions demonstrating the implementation and monitoring of safety and health precautions for the entire worksite.

7. In accordance with Section 34A-6-110, nothing in this Rule shall:

a. be deemed to limit or repeal requirements imposed by statute or otherwise recognized by law; or

b. be construed or held to supersede or in any manner affect workers' compensation or enlarge or diminish or affect the common-law or statutory rights, duties, or liabilities of employers and employees under any law with respect to injuries, occupational or other diseases, or death of employees arising out of, or in the course of employment.

R614-1-8. Recording and Reporting Occupational Injuries and Illnesses.

A. The rules in this section implement Sections 34A-6-108 and 34A-6-301(3) of the Act. These sections provide for record-keeping and reporting by employers covered under the Act, for developing information regarding the causes and prevention of occupational accidents and illnesses, and for maintaining a program of collection, compilation, and analysis of occupational safety and health statistics. Regardless of size or type of operation, accidents and fatalities must be reported to UOSH in accordance with the requirements of R614-1-5.C.

NOTE: Utah has adopted and will enforce the Federal Recordkeeping Standard 29CFR1904.

Utah Specific Recordkeeping requirements follow:

B. Supplementary record.

Each employer shall have available for inspection at each establishment within 6 working days after receiving information that a recordable case has occurred, a supplementary record for that establishment. The record shall be completed in the detail prescribed in the instructions accompanying federal OSHA Form No. 301, Utah Industrial Accidents Form 122. Workers' compensation, insurance, or other reports are acceptable alternative records if they contain the information required by the federal OSHA Form No. 301, Utah Industrial Accidents Form 122. If no acceptable alternative record is maintained for other purposes, Federal OSHA Form No. 301, Utah Industrial Accidents Form 122 shall be used or the necessary information shall be otherwise maintained.

C. Retention of records.

Preservation of records.

a. This section applies to each employer who makes, maintains or has access to employee exposure records or employee medical records.

b. "Employee exposure record" means a record of monitoring or measuring which contains qualitative or quantitative information indicative of employee exposures to toxic materials or harmful physical agents. This includes both individual exposure records and general research or statistical studies based on information collected from exposure records.

c. "Employee medical record" means a record which contains information concerning the health status of an employee or employees exposed or potentially exposed to toxic materials or harmful physical agents. These records may include, but are not limited to:

(1) The results of medical examinations and tests;

(2) Any opinions or recommendations of a physician or other health professional concerning the health of an employee or employees; and

(3) Any employee medical complaints relating to workplace exposure. Employee medical records include both individual medical records and general research or statistical studies based on information collected from medical records.

d. Preservation of records. Each employer who makes, maintains, or has access to employee exposure records or employee medical records shall preserve these records.

e. Availability of records. The employer shall make available, upon request to the Administrator, or a designee, and to the Director of the Division of Health, or a designee, all employee exposure records and employee medical records for examination and copying.

D. Access to records.

1. Records provided for in R614-1-8.A.,E., and F. shall be available for inspection and copying by Compliance Officers during any occupational safety and health inspection provided for under R614-1-7 and Section 34A-6-301 of the Act.

2. The log and summary of all recordable occupational injuries and illnesses (OSHA No. 200) (the log) provided for in R614-1-8.A. shall, upon request, be made available by the employer to any employee, former employee, and to their representatives for examination and copying in a reasonable manner and at reasonable times. The employee, former employee, and their representatives shall have access to the log for any establishment in which the employee is or has been employed.

3. Nothing in this section shall be deemed to preclude employees and employee representatives from collectively bargaining to obtain access to information relating to occupational injuries and illnesses in addition to the information made available under this section.

4. Access to the log provided under this section shall pertain to all logs retained under requirements of R614-1-8.G.

E. Reporting of fatality or accidents. (Refer to Utah Occupational Safety and Health Rule, R614-1-5.C.)

F. Falsification or failure to keep records or reports.

1. Section 34A-6-307 of the Act provides penalties for false information and recordkeeping.

2. Failure to maintain records or file reports required by this part, or in the details required by forms and instructions issued under this part, may result in the issuance of citations and assessment of penalties as provided for in Sections 34A-6-302 and 34A-6-307 of the Act.

G. Description of statistical program.

1. Section 34A-6-108 of the Act directs the Administrator to develop and maintain a program of collection, compilation, and analysis of occupational safety and health statistics. The program shall consist of periodic surveys of occupational injuries and illnesses.

2. The sample design encompasses probability procedures, detailed stratification by industry and size, and a systematic selection within Stratification. Stratification and sampling will be carried out in order to provide the most efficient sample for eventual state estimates. Some industries will be sampled more heavily than others depending on the injury rate level based on previous experience. The survey should produce adequate estimates for most four-digit Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) industries in manufacturing and for three-digit classification (SIC) in non-manufacturing. Full cooperation with the U. S. Department of Labor in statistical programs is intended.

R614-1-9. Rules of Practice for Temporary or Permanent Variance from the Utah Occupational Safety and Health Standards. (Also Adopted and Published as Chapter XXIII of the Utah Occupational Safety and Health Field Operations Manual.)

A. Scope.

1. This rule contains Rules of Practice for Administrative procedures to grant variances and other relief under Section 34A-6-202 of the Act. General information pertaining to employer-employee rights, obligations and procedures are included.

B. Application for, or petition against Variances and other relief.

1. The applicable parts of Section 34A-6-202 of the Act shall govern application and petition procedure.

2. Any employer or class of employers desiring a variance from a standard must make a formal written request including the following information:

a. The name and address of applicant;

b. The address of the place or places of employment involved;

c. A specification of the standard or portion thereof from which the applicant seeks a variance;

d. A statement by the applicant, supported by opinions from qualified persons having first-hand knowledge of the facts of the case, that he is unable to comply with the standard or portion thereof and a detailed statement of the reasons therefore;

e. A statement of the steps the applicant has taken and will take, with specific dates where appropriate, to protect employees against the hazard covered by the existing standard;

f. A statement of when the applicant expects to be able to comply with the standard and of what steps he has taken and will take, with specific dates where appropriate, to come into compliance with the standards (applies to temporary variances);

g. A statement of the facts the applicant would show to establish that (applies to newly promulgated standards);

(1) The applicant is unable to comply with a standard by its effective date because of unavailability of professional or technical personnel or of materials and equipment needed to come into compliance with the standard or because necessary construction or alteration of facilities cannot be completed by the effective date;

(2) He is taking all available steps to safeguard his employees against the hazards covered by the standards; and

(3) He has an effective program for coming into compliance with the standard as quickly as practicable;

h. Any request for a hearing, as provided in this rule;

i. A statement that the applicant has informed his affected employees of the application for variance by giving a copy thereof to their authorized representative, posting a summary statement of the application at the place or places where notices to employees are normally posted specifying where a copy may be examined; and

j. A description of how affected employees have been informed of their rights to petition the Administrator for a hearing.

3. The applicant shall designate the method he will use to safeguard his employees until a variance is granted or denied.

4. Whenever a proceeding on a citation or a related issue concerning a proposed penalty or period of abatement has been contested and is pending before an Administrative Law Judge or any subsequent review under the Administrative Procedures Act, until the completion of such proceeding, the Administrator may deny a variance application on a subject or an issue concerning a citation which has been issued to the employer.

C. Hearings.

1. The Administrator may conduct hearings upon application or petition in accordance with Section 34A-6-202(4) of the Act if:

a. Employee(s), the public, or other interested groups petition for a hearing; or

b. The Administrator deems it in the public or employee interest.

2. When a hearing is considered appropriate, the Administrator shall set the date, time, and place for such hearing. He shall provide timely notification to the applicant for variance and the petitioners. In the notice of hearing to the applicant, the applicant will be directed to notify his employees of the hearing.

3. Notice of hearings shall be published in the Administrative Rulemaking Bulletin. This shall include a statement that the application request may be inspected at the UOSH Division Office.

4. A copy of the Notification of Hearing along with other pertinent information shall be sent to the U.S. Department of Labor, Regional Administrator for OSHA.

D. Inspection for Variance Application.

1. A variance inspection will be required by the Administrator or his designee prior to final determination of either acceptance or denial.

2. A variance inspection is a single purpose, pre-announced, non-compliance inspection and shall include employee or employer representative participation or interview where necessary.

E. Interim order.

1. The purpose of an interim order is to permit an employer to proceed in a non-standard operation while administrative procedures are being completed. Use of this interim procedure is dependent upon need and employee safety.

2. Following a variance inspection, and after determination and assurance that employees are to be adequately protected, the Administrator may immediately grant, in writing, an interim order. To expedite the effect of the interim order, it may be issued at the work-site by the Administrator. The interim order will remain in force pending completion of the administrative promulgation action and the formal granting or denying of a temporary/permanent variance as requested.

F. Decision of the Administrator.

1. The Administrator may deny the application if:

a. It does not meet the requirements of paragraph R614-1-8.B.;

b. It does not provide adequate safety in the workplace for affected employees; or

c. Testimony or information provided by the hearing or inspection does not support the applicant's request for variance as submitted.

2. Letters of notification denying variance applications shall be sent to the applicant, and will include posting requirements to inform employees, affected associations, and employer groups.

a. A copy of correspondence related to the denial request shall be sent to the U.S. Department of Labor, Regional Administrator for OSHA.

b. The letter of denial shall be explicit in detail as to the reason(s) for such action.

3. The Administrator may grant the request for variances provided that:

a. Data supplied by the applicant, the UOSHA inspection and information and testimony affords adequate protection for the affected employee(s);

b. Notification of approval shall follow the pattern described in R614-1-9.C.2. and 3.;

c. Limitations, restrictions, or requirements which become part of the variance shall be documented in the letter granting the variance.

4. The Administrator's decision shall be deemed final subject to Section 34A-6-202(6).

G. Recommended Time Table for Variance Action.

1. Publication of agency intent to grant a variance. This includes public comment and hearing notification in the Utah Administrative Rulemaking Bulletin: within 30 days after receipt.

2. Public comment period: within 20 days after publication.

3. Public hearing: within 30 days after publication

4. Notification of U.S. Department of Labor Regional Administrator for OSHA: 10 days after agency publication of intent.

5. Final Order: 120 days after receipt of variance application if publication of agency intent is made.

6. Rejection of variance application without publication of agency intent: 20 days after receipt of application.

a. Notification of U.S. Department of Labor Regional Administrator for OSHA: 20 days after receipt of application.

H. Public Notice of Granted Variances, Tolerances, Exemptions, and Limitations.

1. Every final action granting variance, exemption, or limitation under this rule shall be published as required under Title 63G, Chapter 3, Utah Administrative Rulemaking Act, and the time table set forth in R614-1-9.G.

I. Acceptance of federally Granted Variances.

1. Where a variance has been granted by the U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration, following Federal Promulgation procedures, the Administrator shall take the following action:

a. Compare the federal OSHA standard for which the variance was granted with the equivalent UOSH standard.

b. Identify possible application in Utah.

c. If the UOSH standard under consideration for application of the variance has exactly or essentially the same intent as the federal standard and there is the probability of a multi-state employer doing business in Utah, then the Administrator shall accept the variance (as federally accepted) and promulgate it for Utah under the provisions of Title 63G, Chapter 3, Utah Administrative Rulemaking Act.

d. If the variance has no apparent application to Utah industry, or to a multi-state employer in Utah, or if it conflicts with Utah Legislative intent, or established policy or procedure, the federal variance shall not be accepted. In such case, the Regional Administrator will be so notified.

J. Revocation of a Variance.

1. Any variance (temporary or permanent) whether approved by the state or one accepted by State based on Federal approval, may be revoked by the Administrator if it is determined through on-site inspection that:

a. The employer is not complying with provisions of the variance as granted;

b. Adequate employee safety is not afforded by the original provisions of the variance; or

c. A more stringent standard has been promulgated, is in force, and conflicts with prior considerations given for employee safety.

2. A federally approved national variance may be revoked by the state for a specific work-site or place of employment within the state for reasons cited in R614-1-9.J.1. Such revocations must be in writing and give full particulars and reasons prompting the action. Full rights provided under the law, such as hearings, etc., must be afforded the employer.

3. Normally, permanent variances may be revoked or changed only after being in effect for at least six months.

K. Coordination.

1. All variances issued by the Administrator will be coordinated with the U.S. Department of Labor, OSHA to insure consistency and avoid improper unilateral action.

R614-1-10. Discrimination.

A. General.

1. The Act provides, among other things, for the adoption of occupational safety and health standards, research and development activities, inspections and investigations of work places, and record keeping requirements. Enforcement procedures initiated by the Commission; review proceedings as required by Title 63G, Chapter 4, Administrative Procedures Act; and judicial review are provided by the Act.

2. This rule deals essentially with the rights of employees afforded under section 34A-6-203 of the Act. Section 34A-6-203 of the Act prohibits reprisals, in any form, against employees who exercise rights under the Act.

3. The purpose is to make available in one place interpretations of the various provisions of Section 34A-6-203 of the Act which will guide the Administrator in the performance of his duties thereunder unless and until otherwise directed by authoritative decisions of the courts, or concluding, upon reexamination of an interpretation, that it is incorrect.

B. Persons prohibited from discriminating.

Section 34A-6-203 defines employee protections under the Act, because the employee has exercised rights under the Act. Section 34A-6-103(11) of the Act defines "person". Consequently, the prohibitions of Section 34A-6-203 are not limited to actions taken by employers against their own employees. A person may be chargeable with discriminatory action against an employee of another person. Section 34A-6-203 would extend to such entities as organizations representing employees for collective bargaining purposes, employment agencies, or any other person in a position to discriminate against an employee. (See, Meek v. United States, F. 2d 679 (6th Cir., 1943); Bowe v. Judson C. Burnes, 137 F 2d 37 (3rd Cir., 1943).)

C. Persons protected by section 34A-6-203.

1. All employees are afforded the full protection of Section 34A-6-203. For purposes of the Act, an employee is defined in Section 34A-6-103(6). The Act does not define the term "employ". However, the broad remedial nature of this legislation demonstrates a clear legislative intent that the existence of an employment relationship, for purposes of Section 34A-6-203, is to be based upon economic realities rather than upon common law doctrines and concepts. For a similar interpretation of federal law on this issue, see, U.S. v. Silk, 331 U.S. 704 (1947); Rutherford Food Corporation v. McComb, 331 U.S. 722 (1947).

2. For purposes of Section 34A-6-203, even an applicant for employment could be considered an employee. (See, NLRB v. Lamar Creamery, 246 F. 2d 8 (5th Cir., 1957).) Further, because Section 34A-6-203 speaks in terms of any employee, it is also clear that the employee need not be an employee of the discriminator. The principal consideration would be whether the person alleging discrimination was an "employee" at the time of engaging in protected activity.

3. In view of the definitions of "employer" and "employee" contained in the Act, employees of a State or political subdivision thereof would be within the coverage of Section 34A-6-203.

D. Unprotected activities distinguished.

1. Actions taken by an employer, or others, which adversely affect an employee may be predicated upon nondiscriminatory grounds. The proscriptions of Section 34A-6-203 apply when the adverse action occurs because the employee has engaged in protected activities. An employee's engagement in activities protected by the Act does not automatically render him immune from discharge or discipline for legitimate reasons, or from adverse action dictated by non-prohibited considerations. (See, NLRB v. Dixie Motor Coach Corp., 128 F. 2d 201 (5th Cir., 1942).)

2. To establish a violation of Section 34A-6-203, the employee's engagement in protected activity need not be the sole consideration behind discharge or other adverse action. If protected activity was a substantial reason for the action, or if the discharge or other adverse action would not have taken place "but for" engagement in protected activity, Section 34A-6-203 has been violated. (See, Mitchell v. Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co., 278 F. 2d 562 (8th Cir., 1960); Goldberg v. Bama Manufacturing, 302 F. 2d 152 (5th Cir., 1962).) Ultimately, the issue as to whether a discharge was because of protected activity will have to be determined on the basis of the facts in the particular case.

E. Specific protections - complaints under or related to the Act.

1. Discharge of, or discrimination against an employee because the employee has filed "any complaint under or related to this Act" is prohibited by Section 34A-6-203. An example of a complaint made "under" the Act would be an employee request for inspection pursuant to Section 34A-6-301(6). However, this would not be the only type of complaint protected by Section 34A-6-203. The range of complaints "related to" the Act is commensurate with the broad remedial purposes of this legislation and the sweeping scope of its application, which entails the full extent of the commerce power. ((See Cong. Rec., vol. 116 P. 42206 December 17, 1970).)

2. Complaints registered with Federal agencies which have the authority to regulate or investigate occupational safety and health conditions are complaints "related to" this Act. Likewise, complaints made to State or local agencies regarding occupational safety and health conditions would be "related to" the Act. Such complaints, however, must relate to conditions at the workplace, as distinguished from complaints touching only upon general public safety and health.

3. Further, the salutary principles of the Act would be seriously undermined if employees were discouraged from lodging complaints about occupational safety and health matters with their employers. Such complaints to employers, if made in good faith, therefore would be related to the Act, and an employee would be protected against discharge or discrimination caused by a complaint to the employer.

F. Proceedings under or related to the act.

1. Discharge of, or discrimination against, any employee because the employee has exercised the employee's rights under or related to this Act is also prohibited by Section 34A-6-203. Examples of proceedings which would arise specifically under the Act would be inspections of work-sites under Section 34A-6-301 of the Act, employee contest of abatement date under Section 34A-6-303 of the Act, employee initiation of proceedings for promulgation of an occupational safety and health standard under Section 34A-6-202 of the Act and Title 63G, Chapter 3, employee application for modification of revocation of a variance under Section 34A-6-202(4)(c) of the Act and R614-1-9., employee judicial challenge to a standard under Section 34A-6-202(6) of the Act, and employee appeal of an order issued by an Administrative Law Judge, Commissioner, or Appeals Board under Section 34A-6-304. In determining whether a "proceeding" is "related to" the Act, the considerations discussed in R614-1-10.G. would also be applicable.

2. An employee need not himself directly institute the proceedings. It is sufficient if he sets into motion activities of others which result in proceedings under or related to the Act.

G. Testimony.

Discharge of, or discrimination against, any employee because the employee "has testified or is about to testify" in proceedings under or related to the Act is also prohibited by Section 34A-6-203. This protection would of course not be limited to testimony in proceedings instituted or caused to be instituted by the employee, but would extend to any statements given in the course of judicial, quasi-judicial, and administrative proceedings, including inspections, investigations, and administrative rulemaking or adjudicative functions. If the employee is giving or is about to give testimony in any proceeding under or related to the Act, he would be protected against discrimination resulting from such testimony.

H. Exercise of any right afforded by the Act.

1. In addition to protecting employees who file complaints, institute proceedings under or related to the Act it also prohibited by Section 34A-6-203 discrimination occurring because of the exercise "of any right afforded by this Act." Certain rights are explicitly provided in the Act; for example, there is a right to participate as a party in enforcement proceedings (34A-6-303). Certain other rights exist by necessary implications. For example, employees may request information from the Utah Occupational Safety and Health Administration; such requests would constitute the exercise of a right afforded by the Act. Likewise, employees interviewed by agents of the Administrator in the course of inspections or investigations could not subsequently be discriminated against because of their cooperation.

2. Review of the Act and examination of the legislative history discloses that, as a general matter, there is no right afforded by the Act which would entitle employees to walk off the job because of potential unsafe conditions at the workplace. Hazardous conditions which may be violative of the Act will ordinarily be corrected by the employer, once brought to his attention. If corrections are not accomplished, or if there is dispute about the existence of a hazard, the employee will normally have opportunity to request inspection of the workplace pursuant to Section 34A-6-301 of the Act, or to seek the assistance of other public agencies which have responsibility in the field of safety and health. Under such circumstances, therefore, an employer would not ordinarily be in violation of Section 34A-6-203 by taking action to discipline an employee for refusing to perform normal job activities because of alleged safety or health hazards.

a. Occasions might arise when an employee is confronted with a choice between not performing assigned tasks or subjecting himself to serious injury or death arising from a hazardous condition at the workplace. If the employee, with no reasonable alternative, refuses in good faith to expose himself to the dangerous condition, he would be protected against subsequent discrimination. The condition causing the employee's apprehension of death or injury must be of such a nature that a reasonable person, under the circumstances then confronting the employee, would conclude that there is a real danger of death or serious injury and that there is insufficient time, due to the urgency of the situation, to eliminate the danger through resort to regular statutory enforcement channels. In addition, in such circumstances, the employee, where possible, must also have sought from his employer, and been unable to obtain, a correction of the dangerous condition.

I. Procedures - Filing of complaint for discrimination.

1. Who may file. A complaint of Section 34A-6-203 discrimination may be filed by the employee himself, or by a representative authorized to do so on his behalf.

2. Nature of filing. No particular form of complaint is required.

3. Place of filing. Complaint should be filed with the Administrator, Division of Occupational Safety and Health, Labor Commission, 160 East 300 South, Salt Lake City, Utah 84114-6650, Telephone 530-6901.

4. Time for filing.

a. Section 34A-6-203(2)(b) provides protection for an employee who believes that he has been discriminated against.

b. A major purpose of the 30-day period in this provision is to allow the Administrator to decline to entertain complaints which have become stale. Accordingly, complaints not filed within 30 days of an alleged violation will ordinarily be presumed to be untimely.

c. However, there may be circumstances which would justify tolling of the 30-day period on recognized equitable principles or because of strongly extenuating circumstances, e.g., where the employer has concealed, or misled the employee regarding the grounds for discharge or other adverse action; where the employee has, within the 30-day period, resorted in good faith to grievance-arbitration proceedings under a collective bargaining agreement or filed a complaint regarding the same general subject with another agency; where the discrimination is in the nature of a continuing violation. In the absence of circumstances justifying a tolling of the 30-day period, untimely complaints will not be processed.

J. Notification of administrator's determination.

The Administrator is to notify a complainant within 90 days of the complaint of his determination whether prohibited discrimination has occurred. This 90-day provision is considered directory in nature. While every effort will be made to notify complainants of the Administrator's determination within 90 days, there may be instances when it is not possible to meet the directory period set forth in this section.

K. Withdrawal of complaint.

Enforcement of the provisions of Section 34A-6-203 is not only a matter of protecting rights of individual employees, but also of public interest. Attempts by an employee to withdraw a previously filed complaint will not necessarily result in termination of the Administrator's investigation. The Administrator's jurisdiction cannot be foreclosed as a matter of law by unilateral action of the employee. However, a voluntary and uncoerced request from a complainant to withdraw his complaint will be given careful consideration and substantial weight as a matter of policy and sound enforcement procedure.

L. Arbitration or other agency proceedings.

1. An employee who files a complaint under Section 34A-6-203(2) of the Act may also pursue remedies under grievance arbitration proceedings in collective bargaining agreements. In addition, the complainant may concurrently resort to other agencies for relief, such as the National Labor Relations Board. The Administrator's jurisdiction to entertain Section 34A-6-203 complaints, to investigate, and to determine whether discrimination has occurred, is independent of the jurisdiction of other agencies or bodies. The Administrator may file action in district court regardless of the pendency of other proceedings.

2. However, the Administrator also recognizes the policy favoring voluntary resolution of disputes under procedures in collective bargaining agreements. (See, e.g., Boy's Market, Inc. v. Retail Clerks, 398 U.S. 235 (1970); Republic Steel Corp. v. Maddox, 379 U.S. 650 (1965); Carey v. Westinghouse Electric Co., 375 U.S. 261 (1964); Collier Insulated Wire, 192 NLRB No. 150 (1971).) By the same token, due deference should be paid to the jurisdiction of other forums established to resolve disputes which may also be related to Section 34A-6-203 complaints.

3. Where a complainant is in fact pursuing remedies other than those provided by Section 34A-6-203, postponement of the Administrator's determination and deferral to the results of such proceedings may be in order. (See, Burlington Truck Lines, Inc., v. U.S., 371 U.S. 156 (1962).)

4. Postponement of determination. Postponement of determination would be justified where the rights asserted in other proceedings are substantially the same as rights under Section 34A-6-203 and those proceedings are not likely to violate the rights guaranteed by Section 34A-6-203. The factual issues in such proceedings must be substantially the same as those raised by Section 34A-6-203 complaint, and the forum hearing the matter must have the power to determine the ultimate issue of discrimination. (See, Rios v. Reynolds Metals Co., F. 2d (5th Cir., 1972), 41 U.S.L.W. 1049 (October 10, 1972): Newman v. Avco Corp., 451 F. 2d 743 (6th Cir., 1971).)

5. Deferral to outcome of other proceedings. A determination to defer to the outcome of other proceedings initiated by a complainant must necessarily be made on a case-to-case basis, after careful scrutiny of all available information. Before deferring to the results of other proceedings, it must be clear that those proceedings dealt adequately with all factual issues, that the proceedings were fair, regular, and free of procedural infirmities, and that the outcome of the proceedings was not repugnant to the purpose and policy of the Act. In this regard, if such other actions initiated by a complainant are dismissed without adjudicative hearing thereof, such dismissal will not ordinarily be regarded as determinative of the Section 34A-6-203 complaint.

M. Employee refusal to comply with safety rules.

Employees who refuse to comply with occupational safety and health standards or valid safety rules implemented by the employer in furtherance of the Act are not exercising any rights afforded by the Act. Disciplinary measures taken by employers solely in response to employee refusal to comply with appropriate safety rules and regulations, will not ordinarily be regarded as discriminatory action prohibited by Section 34A-6-203. This situation should be distinguished from refusals to work, as discussed in R614-1-10.H.

R614-1-11. Rules of Agency Practice and Procedure Concerning UOSH Access to Employee Medical Records.

A. Policy.

UOSH access to employee medical records will in certain circumstances be important to the agency's performance of its statutory functions. Medical records, however, contain personal details concerning the lives of employees. Due to the substantial personal privacy interests involved, UOSH authority to gain access to personally identifiable employee medical information will be exercised only after the agency has made a careful determination of its need for this information, and only with appropriate safeguards to protect individual privacy. Once this information is obtained, UOSH examination and use of it will be limited to only that information needed to accomplish the purpose for access. Personally identifiable employee medical information will be retained by UOSH only for so long as needed to accomplish the purpose for access, will be kept secure while being used, and will not be disclosed to other agencies or members of the public except in narrowly defined circumstances. This section establishes procedures to implement these policies.

B. Scope.

1. Except as provided in paragraphs R614-1-11.B.3. through 6. below, this rule applies to all requests by UOSH personnel to obtain access to records in order to examine or copy personally identifiable employee medical information, whether or not pursuant to the access provision of R614-1-12.D.

2. For the purposes of this rule, "personally identifiably employee medical information" means employee medical information accompanied by either direct identifiers (name, address, social security number, payroll number, etc.) or by information which could reasonably be used in the particular circumstances indirectly to identify specific employees (e.g., exact age, height, weight, race, sex, date of initial employment, job title, etc.).

3. This rule does not apply to UOSH access to, or the use of, aggregate employee medical information or medical records on individual employees which is not a personally identifiable form. This section does not apply to records required by R614-1-8 to death certificates, or to employee exposure records, including biological monitoring records defined by R614-1-3.M. or by specific occupational safety and health standards as exposure records.

4. This rule does not apply where UOSH compliance personnel conduct an examination of employee medical records solely to verify employer compliance with the medical surveillance record keeping requirements of an occupational safety and health standard, or with R614-1-12. An examination of this nature shall be conducted on-site and, if requested, shall be conducted under the observation of the record holder. The UOSH compliance personnel shall not record and take off-site any information from medical records other than documentation of the fact of compliance or non-compliance.

5. This rule does not apply to agency access to, or the use of, personally identifiable employee medical information obtained in the course of litigation.

6. This rule does not apply where a written directive by the Administrator authorizes appropriately qualified personnel to conduct limited reviews of specific medical information mandated by an occupational safety and health standard, or of specific biological monitoring test results.

7. Even if not covered by the terms of this rule, all medically related information reported in a personally identifiable form shall be handled with appropriate discretion and care befitting all information concerning specific employees. There may, for example, be personal privacy interests involved which militate against disclosure of this kind of information to the public.

C. Responsible persons.

1. UOSH Administrator. The Administrator of the Division of Occupational Safety and Health of the Labor Commission shall be responsible for the overall administration and implementation of the procedures contained in this rule, including making final UOSH determinations concerning:

a. Access to personally identifiable employee medical information, and

b. Inter-agency transfer or public disclosure of personally identifiable employee medical information.

2. UOSH Medical Records Officer. The Administrator shall designate a UOSH official with experience or training in the evaluation, use, and privacy protection of medical records to be the UOSH Medical Records Officer. The UOSH Medical Records Officer shall report directly to the Administrator on matters concerning this section and shall be responsible for:

a. Making recommendations to the Administrator as to the approval or denial of written access orders.

b. Assuring that written access orders meet the requirements of paragraphs R614-1-11.D.2. and 3. of this rule.

c. Responding to employee, collective bargaining agent, and employer objections concerning written access orders.

d. Regulating the use of direct personal identifiers.

e. Regulating internal agency use and security of personally identifiable employee medical information.

f. Assuring that the results of agency analyses of personally identifiable medical information are, where appropriate, communicated to employees.

g. Preparing an annual report of UOSH's experience under this rule.

h. Assuring that advance notice is given of intended inter-agency transfers or public disclosures.

3. Principal UOSH Investigator. The Principal UOSH Investigator shall be the UOSH employee in each instance of access to personally identifiable employee medical information who is made primarily responsible for assuring that the examination and use of this information is performed in the manner prescribed by a written access order and the requirements of this section. When access is pursuant to a written access order, the Principal UOSH Investigator shall be professionally trained in medicine, public health, or allied fields (epidemiology, toxicology, industrial hygiene, bio-statistics, environmental health, etc.)

D. Written access orders.

1. Requirement for written access order. Except as provided in paragraph R614-1-11.D.4. below, each request by a UOSH representative to examine or copy personally identifiable employee medical information contained in a record held by an employer or other record holder shall be made pursuant to a written access order which has been approved by the Administrator upon the recommendation of the UOSH Medical Records Officer. If deemed appropriate, a written access order may constitute, or be accompanied by an administrative subpoena.

2. Approval criteria for written access order. Before approving a written access order, the Administrator and the UOSH Medical Records Officer shall determine that:

a. The medical information to be examined or copied is relevant to a statutory purpose and there is a need to gain access to this personally identifiable information.

b. The personally identifiable medical information to be examined or copied is limited to only that information needed to accomplish the purpose for access, and

c. The personnel authorized to review and analyze the personally identifiable medical information are limited to those who have a need for access and have appropriate professional qualifications.

3. Content of written access order. Each written access order shall state with reasonable particularity:

a. The statutory purposes for which access is sought.

b. The general description of the kind of employee medical information that will be examined and why there is a need to examine personally identifiable information.

c. Whether medical information will be examined on-site, and what type of information will be copied and removed off-site.

d. The name, address, and phone number of the Principal UOSH Investigator and the names of any other authorized persons who are expected to review and analyze the medical information.

e. The name, address, and phone number of the UOSH Medical Records Officer, and

f. The anticipated period of time during which UOSH expects to retain the employee medical information in a personally identifiable form.

4. Special situations. Written access orders need not be obtained to examine or copy personally identifiable employee medical information under the following circumstances:

a. Specific written consent. If the specific written consent of an employee is obtained pursuant to R614-1-12.D., and the agency or an agency employee is listed on the authorization as the designated representative to receive the medical information, then a written access order need not be obtained. Whenever personally identifiable employee medical information is obtained through specific written consent and taken off-site, a Principal UOSH Investigator shall be promptly named to assure protection of the information, and the UOSH Medical Records Officer shall be notified of this person's identity. The personally identifiable medical information obtained shall thereafter be subject to the use and security requirements of paragraphs R614-1-11.H.

b. Physician consultations. A written access order need not be obtained where a UOSH staff or contract physician consults with an employer's physician concerning an occupational safety or health issue. In a situation of this nature, the UOSH physician may conduct on-site evaluation of employee medical records in consultation with the employer's physician, and may make necessary personal notes of his or her findings. No employee medical records however, shall be taken off-site in the absence of a written access order or the specific written consent of an employee, and no notes of personally identifiable employee medical information made by the UOSH physician shall leave his or her control without the permission of the UOSH Medical Records Officer.

E. Presentation of written access order and notice to employees.

1. The Principal UOSH Investigator, or someone under his or her supervision, shall present at least two (2) copies each of the written access order and an accompanying cover letter to the employer prior to examining or obtaining medical information subject to a written access order. At least one copy of the written access order shall not identify specific employees by direct personal identifier. The accompanying cover letter shall summarize the requirements of this section and indicate that questions or objections concerning the written access order may be directed to the Principal UOSH Investigator or to the UOSH Medical Records Officer.

2. The Principal UOSH Investigator shall promptly present a copy of the written access order (which does not identify specific employees by direct personal identifier) and its accompanying cover letter to each collective bargaining agent representing employees whose medical records are subject to the written access order.

3. The Principal UOSH Investigator shall indicate that the employer must promptly post a copy of the written access order which does not identify specific employees by direct personal identifier, as well as post its accompanying cover letter.

4. The Principal UOSH Investigator shall discuss with any collective bargaining agent and with the employer the appropriateness of individual notice to employees affected by the written access order. Where it is agreed that individual notice is appropriate, the Principal UOSH Investigator shall promptly provide to the employer an adequate number of copies of the written access order (which does not identify specific employees by direct personal identifier) and its accompanying cover letter to enable the employer either to individually notify each employee or to place a copy in each employee's medical file.

F. Objections concerning a written access order. All employees, collective bargaining agents, and employer written objections concerning access to records pursuant to a written access order shall be transmitted to the UOSH Medical Records Officer. Unless the agency decides otherwise, access to the record shall proceed without delay notwithstanding the lodging of an objection. The UOSH Medical Records Officer shall respond in writing to each employee's and collective bargaining agent's written objection to UOSH access. Where appropriate, the UOSH Medical Records Officer may revoke a written access order and direct that any medical information obtained by it by returned to the original record holder or destroyed. The principal UOSH Investigator shall assure that such instructions by the UOSH Medical Records Officer are promptly implemented.

G. Removal of direct personal identifiers. Whenever employees medical information obtained pursuant to a written access order is taken off-site with direct personal identifiers included, the Principal UOSH Investigator shall, unless otherwise authorized by the UOSH Medical Records Officer, promptly separate all direct personal identifiers from the medical information, and code the medical information and the list of direct identifiers with a unique identifying number of each employee. The medical information with its numerical code shall thereafter be used and kept secured as though still in a directly identifiable form. The Principal UOSH Investigator shall also hand deliver or mail the list of direct personal identifiers with their corresponding numerical codes to the UOSH Medical Records Officer. The UOSH Medical Records Officer shall thereafter limit the use and distribution of the list of coded identifiers to those with a need to know its contents.

H. Internal agency use of personally identifiable employee medical information.

1. The Principal UOSH Investigator shall in each instance of access be primarily responsible for assuring that personally identifiable employee medical information is used and kept secured in accordance with this section.

2. The Principal UOSH Investigator, the UOSH Medical Records Officer, the Administrator, and any other authorized person listed on a written access order may permit the examination or use of personally identifiable employee medical information by agency employees and contractors who have a need for access, and appropriate qualifications for the purpose for which they are using the information. No UOSH employee or contractor is authorized to examine or otherwise use personally identifiable employee medical information unless so permitted.

3. Where a need exists, access to personally identifiable employee medical information may be provided to attorneys in the office of the State Attorney General, and to agency contractors who are physicians or who have contractually agreed to abide by the requirements of this section and implementing agency directives and instructions.

4. UOSH employees and contractors are only authorized to use personally identifiable employee medical information for the purposes for which it was obtained, unless the specific written consent of the employee is obtained as to a secondary purpose, or the procedures of R614-1-11.D. through G. are repeated with respect to the secondary purpose.

5. Whenever practicable, the examination of personally identifiable employee medical information shall be performed on-site with a minimum of medical information taken off-site in a personally identifiable form.

I. Security procedures.

1. Agency files containing personally identifiable employee medical information shall be segregated from other agency files. When not in active use, files containing this information shall be kept secured in a locked cabinet or vault.

2. The UOSH Medical Records Officer and the Principal UOSH Investigator shall each maintain a log of uses and transfers of personally identifiable employee medical information and lists of coded direct personal identifiers, except as to necessary uses by staff under their direct personal supervision.

3. The photocopying or other duplication of personally identifiable employee medical information shall be kept to the minimum necessary to accomplish the purposes for which the information was obtained.

4. The protective measures established by this rule apply to all worksheets, duplicate copies, or other agency documents containing personally identifiable employee medical information.

5. Intra-agency transfers of personally identifiable employee medical information shall be by hand delivery, United States mail, or equally protective means. Inter-office mailing channels shall not be used.

J. Retention and destruction of records.

1. Consistent with UOSH records disposition programs, personally identifiable employee medical information and lists of coded direct personal identifiers shall be destroyed or returned to the original record holder when no longer needed for the purposes for which they were obtained.

2. Personally identifiable employee medical information which is currently not being used actively but may be needed for future use shall be transferred to the UOSH Medical Records Officer. The UOSH Medical Records Officer shall conduct an annual review of all centrally-held information to determine which information is no longer needed for the purposes for which it was obtained.

K. Results of an agency analysis using personally identifiable employee medical information.

1. The UOSH Medical Records Officer shall, as appropriate, assure that the results of an agency analysis using personally identifiable employee medical information are communicated to the employees whose personal medical information was used as a part of the analysis.

2. Annual report. The UOSH Medical Records Officer shall on an annual basis review UOSH's experience under this section during the previous year, and prepare a report to the UOSH Administrator which shall be made available to the public. This report shall discuss:

a. The number of written access orders approved and a summary of the purposes for access;

b. The nature and disposition of employee; collective bargaining agent, and employer written objections concerning UOSH access to personally identifiable employee medical information; and

c. The nature and disposition of requests for inter-agency transfer or public disclosure of personally identifiable employee medical information.

L. Inter-agency transfer and public disclosure.

1. Personally identifiable employee medical information shall not be transferred to another agency or office outside of UOSH (other than to The Attorney General's Office) or disclosed to the public (other than to the affected employee or the original record holder) except when required by law or when approved by the Administrator.

2. Except as provided in paragraph R614-1-11.L.3. below, the Administrator shall not approve a request for an inter-agency transfer of personally identifiable employee medical information, which has not been consented to by the affected employees, unless the request is by a public health agency which:

a. Needs the requested information in a personally identifiable form for a substantial public health purpose;

b. Will not use the requested information to make individual determinations concerning affected employees which could be to their detriment;

c. Has regulations or established written procedures providing protection for personally identifiable medical information substantially equivalent to that of this section; and

d. Satisfies an exemption to the Privacy Act to the extent that the Privacy Act applies to the requested information (See 5 U.S.C. 552a(b); 29 CFR 70a.3).

3. Upon the approval of the Administrator, personally identifiable employee medical information may be transferred to:

a. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).

b. The Department of Justice when necessary with respect to a specific action under the federal Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 and Utah Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1973.

4. The Administrator shall not approve a request for public disclosure of employee medical information containing direct personal identifiers unless there are compelling circumstances affecting the health or safety of an individual.

5. The Administrator shall not approve a request for public disclosure of employee medical information which contains information which could reasonably be used indirectly to identify specific employees when the disclosure would constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy.

6. Except as to inter-agency transfers to NIOSH or the State Attorney General's Office, the UOSH Medical Records Officer shall assure that advance notice is provided to any collective bargaining agent representing affected employees and to the employer on each occasion that UOSH intends to either transfer personally identifiable employee medical information to another agency or disclose it to a member of the public other than to an affected employee. When feasible, the UOSH Medical Records Officer shall take reasonable steps to assure that advance notice is provided to affected employees when the employee medical information to be released or disclosed contains direct personal identifiers.

M. Effective date.

This rule shall become effective on January 15, 1981.

R614-1-12. Access to Employee Exposure and Medical Records.

A. Purpose.

To provide employees and their designated representatives a right of access to relevant exposure and medical records, and to provide representatives of the Administrator a right of access to these records in order to fulfill responsibilities under the Utah Occupational Safety and Health Act. Access by employees, their representatives, and the Administrator is necessary to yield both direct and indirect improvements in the detection, treatment, and prevention of occupational disease. Each employer is responsible for assuring compliance with this Rule, but the activities involved in complying with the access to medical records provisions can be carried out, on behalf of the employer, by the physician or other health care personnel in charge of employee medical records. Except as expressly provided, nothing in this Rule is intended to affect existing legal and ethical obligations concerning the maintenance and confidentiality of employee medical information, the duty to disclose information to a patient/employee or any other aspect of the medical-care relationship, or affect existing legal obligations concerning the protection of trade secret information.

B. Scope.

1. This rule applies to each general industry, maritime, and construction employer who makes, maintains, contracts for, or has access to employee exposure or medical records, or analyses thereof, pertaining to employees exposed to toxic substances or harmful physical agents.

2. This rule applies to all employee exposure and medical records, and analyses thereof, of employees exposed to toxic substances or harmful physical agents, whether or not the records are related to specific occupational safety and health standards.

3. This rule applies to all employee exposure and medical records, and analyses thereof, made or maintained in any manner, including on an in-house or contractual (e.g., fee-for-service) basis. Each employer shall assure that the preservation and access requirements of this rule are complied with regardless of the manner in which records are made or maintained.

C. Preservation of records.

1. Unless a specific occupational safety and health standard provides a different period of time, each employer shall assure the preservation and retention of records as follows:

a. Employee medical records. Each employee medical record shall be preserved and maintained for a least the duration of employment plus thirty (30) years, except that health insurance claims records maintained separately from the employer's medical program and its records need not be retained for any specified period.

b. Employee exposure records. Each employee exposure record shall be preserved and maintained for at least thirty (30) years, except that:

(1) Background data to environmental (workplace) monitoring or measuring, such a laboratory reports and worksheets, need only be retained for one (1) year so long as the sampling results, the collection methodology (sampling plan), a description of the analytical and mathematical methods used, and a summary of other background data relevant to interpretation of the results obtained, are retained for at least thirty (30) years; and

(2) Material safety data sheets and paragraph R614-1-3.M.4. records concerning the identity of a substance or agent need not be retained for any specified period as long as some record of the identity (chemical name if known) of the substance or agent, where it was used, and when it was used is retained for at least thirty (30) years; and

c. Analyses using exposure or medical records. Each analysis using exposure or medical records shall be preserved and maintained for at least thirty (30) years.

2. Nothing in this rule is intended to mandate the form, manner, or process by which an employer preserves a record so long as the information contained in the record is preserved and retrievable, except that X-ray films shall be preserved in their original state.

D. Access to records.

1. Whenever an employee or designated representative requests access to a record, the employer shall assure that access is provided in a reasonable time, place, and manner, but in no event later than fifteen (15) days after the request for access is made.

2. Whenever an employee or designated representative requests a copy of a record, the employer shall, within the period of time previously specified, assure that either:

a. A copy of the record is provided without cost to the employee or representative;

b. The necessary mechanical copying facilities (e.g., photocopying) are made available without cost to the employee or representative for copying the record; or

c. The record is loaned to the employee or representative for a reasonable time to enable a copy to be made.

3. Whenever a record has been previously provided without cost to an employee or designated representative, the employer may charge reasonable, non-discriminatory administrative costs (i.e., search and copy expenses but not including overhead expenses) for a request by the employee or designated representative for additional copies of the record, except that:

a. An employer shall not charge for an initial request for a copy of new information that has been added to a record which was previously provided; and

b. An employer shall not charge for an initial request by a recognized or certified collective bargaining agent for a copy of an employee exposure record or an analysis using exposure or medical records.

4. Nothing in this rule is intended to preclude employees and collective bargaining agents from collectively bargaining to obtain access to information in addition to that available under this rule.

5. Employee and designated representative access.

a. Employee exposure records. Each employer shall, upon request, assure the access of each employee and designated representative to employee exposure records relevant to the employee. For the purpose of this rule exposure records relevant to the employee consist of:

(1) Records of the employee's past or present exposure to toxic substances or harmful physical agents,

(2) Exposure records of other employees with past or present job duties or working conditions related to or similar to those of the employee,

(3) Records containing exposure information concerning the employee's workplace or working conditions, and

(4) Exposure records pertaining to workplaces or working conditions to which the employee is being assigned or transferred.

b. Employee medical records.

(1) Each employer shall, upon request, assure the access of each employee to employee medical records of which the employee is the subject, except as provided in R614-1-12.D.4.

(2) Each employer shall, upon request, assure the access of each designated representative to the employee medical records of any employee who has given the designated representative specific written consent. R614-1-12A., Appendix A to R614-1-12., contains a sample form which may be used to establish specific written consent for access to employee medical records.

(3) Whenever access to employee medical records is requested, a physician representing the employer may recommend that the employee or designated representative:

(a) Consult with the physician for the purposes of reviewing and discussing the records requested;

(b) Accept a summary of material facts and opinions in lieu of the records requested;, or

(c) Accept release of the requested records only to a physician or other designated representative.

(4) Whenever an employee requests access to his or her employee medical records, and a physician representing the employer believes that direct employee access to information contained in the records regarding a specific diagnosis of a terminal illness or a psychiatric condition could be detrimental to the employees health, the employer may inform the employee that access will only be provided to a designated representative of the employee having specific written consent, and deny the employee's request for direct access to this information only. Where a designated representative with specific written consent requests access to information so withheld, the employer shall assure the access of the designated representative to this information, even when it is known that the designated representative will give the information to the employee.

(5) Nothing in this rule precludes physician, nurse, or other responsible health care personnel maintaining employee medical records from deleting from requested medical records the identity of a family member, personal friend, or fellow employee who has provided confidential information concerning an employee's health status.

c. Analysis using exposure or medical records.

(1) Each employer shall, upon request, assure the access of each employee and designated representative to each analysis using exposure or medical records concerning the employee's working conditions or workplace.

(2) Whenever access is requested to an analysis which reports the contents of employee medical records by either direct identifier (name, address, social security number, payroll number, etc.) or by information which could reasonably be used under the circumstances indirectly to identify specific employees (exact age, height, weight, race, sex, date of initial employment, job title, etc.) the employer shall assure that personal identifiers are removed before access is provided. If the employer can demonstrate that removal of personal identifiers from an analysis is not feasible, access to the personally identifiable portions of analysis need not be provided.

(3) UOSH access.

(a) Each employer shall, upon request, assure the immediate access of representatives of the Administrator to employee exposure and medical records and to analysis using exposure or medical records. Rules of agency practice and procedure governing UOSH access to employee medical records are contained in R614-1-8.

(b) Whenever UOSH seeks access to personally identifiable employee medical information by presenting to the employer a written access order pursuant to R614-1-8, the employer shall prominently post a copy of the written access order and its accompanying cover letter for at least fifteen (15) working days.

E. Trade Secrets.

1. Except as provided in paragraph R614-1-12.E.2., nothing in this rule precludes an employer from deleting from records requested by an employee or designated representative any trade secret data which discloses manufacturing processes, or discloses the percentage of a chemical substance in a mixture, as long as the employee or designated representative is notified that information has been deleted. Whenever deletion of trade secret information substantially impairs evaluation of the place where or the time when exposure to a toxic substance or harmful physical agent occurred, the employer shall provide alternative information which is sufficient to permit the employee to identify where and when exposure occurred.

2. Notwithstanding any trade secret claims, whenever access to records is requested, the employer shall provide access to chemical or physical agent identities including chemical names, levels of exposure, and employee health status data contained in the requested records.

3. Whenever trade secret information is provided to an employee or designated representative, the employer may require, as a condition of access, that the employee or designated representative agree in writing not to use the trade secret information for the purpose of commercial gain and not to permit misuse of the trade secret information by a competitor or potential competitor of the employer.

F. Employee information.

1. Upon an employee's first entering into employment, and at least annually thereafter, each employer shall inform employees exposed to toxic substances or harmful physical agents of the following;

a. The existence, location, and availability of any records covered by this rule;

b. The person responsible for maintaining and providing access to records; and

c. Each employee's right of access to these records.

2. Each employer shall make readily available to employees a copy of this rule and its appendices, and shall distribute to employees any informational materials concerning this rule which are made available to the employer by the Administrator.

G. Transfer of Records

1. Whenever an employer is ceasing to do business, the employer shall transfer all records subject to this Rule to the successor employer. The successor employer shall receive and maintain these records.

2. Whenever an employer is ceasing to do business and there is no successor employer to receive and maintain the records subject to this standard, the employer shall notify affected employees of their rights of access to records at least three (3) months prior to the cessation of the employer's business.

3. Whenever an employer either is ceasing to do business and there is no successor employer to receive and maintain the records, or intends to dispose of any records required to be preserved for at least thirty (30) years, the employer shall:

a. Transfer the records to the Director of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) if so required by a specific occupational safety and health standard; or

b. Notify the Director of NIOSH in writing of the impending disposal of records at least three (3) months prior to the disposal of the records.

4. Where an employer regularly disposes of records required to be preserved for at least thirty (30) years, the employer may, with at least (3) months notice, notify the Director of NIOSH on an annual basis of the records intended to be disposed of in the coming year.

a. Appendices. The information contained in the appendices to this rule is not intended, by itself, to create any additional obligations not otherwise imposed by this rule nor detract from any existing obligation.

H. Effective date. This rule shall become effective on December 5, 1980. All obligations of this rule commence on the effective date except that the employer shall provide the information required under R614-1-12.F.1. to all current employees within sixty (60) days after the effective date.

R614-1-12A. Appendix A to R614-1-12 SAMPLE.

Authorization letter for the Release of Employee Medical Record Information to Designated Representative.

I, (full name of worker/patient), hereby authorize (individual or organization holding the medical records), to release to (individual or organization authorized to receive the medical information), the following medical information from my personal medical records: (Describe generally the information desired to be released).

I give my permission for this medical information to be used for the following purpose: ........, but I do not give permission for any other use or re-disclosure of this information.

(Note---Several extra lines are provided below so that you can place additional restrictions on this authorization letter if you want to. You may, however, leave these lines blank. On the other hand, you may want to (1) specify a particular expiration date for this letter (if less than one year): (2) describe medical information to be created in the future that you intend to be covered by this authorization letter, or (3) describe portions of the medical information in you records which you do not intend to be released as a result of this letter.)

Full name of Employee or Legal Representative

Signature of Employee or Legal Representative

Date of Signature

R614-1-12B. Appendix B to R614-1-12 Availability of NIOSH Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances (RTECS).

R614-1-12 applies to all employee exposure and medical records, and analysis thereof, of employees exposed to toxic substances or harmful physical agents (see R614-1-12.B.2.). The term "toxic substance" or "harmful physical agent" is defined by paragraph R614-1-3.FF. to encompass chemical substances, biological agents, and physical stresses for which there is evidence of harmful health effects. The standard uses the latest printed edition of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances (RTECS) as one of the chief sources of information as to whether evidence of harmful health effects exists. If a substance is listed in the latest printed RTECS, the standard applies to exposure and medical records (and analysis of these records) relevant to employees exposed to the substances.

It is appropriate to note that the final standard does not require that employers purchase a copy of RTECS and many employers need not consult RTECS to ascertain whether their employee exposure or medical records are subject to the standard. Employers who do not currently have the latest printed edition of the NIOSH RTECS, however, may desire to obtain a copy. The RTECS is issued in an annual printed edition as mandated by Rule 20(a)(6) of the Occupational Safety and Health Act (29 U.S.C. 669 (a)(6)). The 1978 edition is the most recent printed edition as of May 1, 1980. Its Forward and Introduction describes the RTECS as follows:

"The annual publication of a list of known toxic substances is a NIOSH mandate under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. It is intended to provide basic information on the known toxic and biological effects of chemical substances for the use of employers, employees, physicians, industrial hygienists, toxicologists, researchers, and, in general, anyone concerned with the proper and safe handling of chemicals. In turn, this information may contribute to a better understanding of potential occupational hazards by everyone involved and ultimately may help to bring about a more healthful workplace environment.

"This registry contains 142,247 listings of chemical substances: 33,929 are names of different chemicals with their associated toxicity data and 90,318 are synonyms. This edition includes approximately 7,500 new chemical compounds that did not appear in the 1977 Registry.

"The Registry's purposes are many, and it serves a variety of users. It is a single source document for basic toxicity information and for other data, such as chemical identifiers and information necessary for the preparation of safety directives and hazard evaluations for chemical substances. The various types of toxic effects linked to literature citations provide researchers and occupational health scientists with an introduction to the toxicological literature, making their own review of the toxic hazards of a given substance easier. By presenting data on the lowest reported doses that produce effects by several routes of entry in various species, the Registry furnishes valuable information to those responsible for preparing safety data sheets for chemical substances in the workplace. Chemical and production engineers can use the Registry to identify the hazards which may be associated with chemical intermediates in the development of final products, and thus can more readily select substitutes or alternate processes which may be less hazardous.

"In this edition of the Registry, the editors intend to identify "all known toxic substances" which may exist in the environment and to provide pertinent data on the toxic effects from known does entering an organism by any route described. Data may be used for the evaluation of chemical hazards in the environment, whether they be in the workplace, recreation area, or living quarters.

"It must be reemphasized that the entry of a substance in the Registry does not automatically mean that it must be avoided. A listing does mean, however, that the substance has the documented potential of being harmful if misused, and care must be exercised to prevent tragic consequences."

The RTECS 1978 printed edition may be purchased for $13.00 from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office (GPO), Washington, D.C. 20402 (202-783-3238) (GPO Stock No. 017-033-00346-7). The 1979 printed edition is anticipated to be issued in the summer of 1980. Some employers may also desire to subscribe to the quarterly update to the RTECS which is published in a microfiche edition. An annual subscription to the quarterly microfiche may be purchase from the GPO for $14.00 (Order the "Microfiche Edition. Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances"). Both the printed edition and the microfiche edition of RTECS are available for review at many university and public libraries throughout the country. The latest RTECS editions may also be examined at OSHA Technical Data Center, Room N2439-Rear, United States Department of Labor, 200 Constitution Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20210 (202-523-9700), or any OSHA Regional or Area Office (See major city telephone directories under United States Government-Labor Department).

KEY

safety

Date of Enactment or Last Substantive Amendment

October 15, 2018

Notice of Continuation

October 19, 2017

Authorizing, Implemented, or Interpreted Law

34A-6


Additional Information

Contact

For questions regarding the content or application of rules under Title R614, please contact the promulgating agency (Labor Commission, Occupational Safety and Health). A list of agencies with links to their homepages is available at http://www.utah.gov/government/agencylist.html or from http://www.rules.utah.gov/contact/agencycontacts.htm.