Utah Administrative Code

The Utah Administrative Code is the body of all effective administrative rules as compiled and organized by the Division of Administrative Rules (see Subsection 63G-3-102(5); see also Sections 63G-3-701 and 702).

NOTE: For a list of rules that have been made effective since October 1, 2019, please see the codification segue page.

NOTE TO RULEFILING AGENCIES: Use the RTF version for submitting rule changes.


R994. Workforce Services, Unemployment Insurance.

Rule R994-403. Claim for Benefits.

As in effect on October 1, 2019

Table of Contents

R994-403-101a. Filing a New Claim.

(1) A new claim for unemployment benefits is made by filing with the Department of Workforce Services Claims Center. A new claim can be filed by completing an application at the Department's website, or as otherwise instructed by the Department.

(2) The effective date of a new claim for benefits is the Sunday of the week in which the claim is filed, provided the claimant did not work full-time during that week, or is not entitled to earnings equal to or in excess of the WBA for that week. A claim for benefits can only be made effective for a prior week if the claimant can establish good cause for late filing in accordance with R994-403-106a.

(3) When a claimant files a new claim during the last week of a quarter and has worked less than full-time for that week, the Department will make the claim effective that week if it is advantageous to the claimant, even if the claimant has earnings for that week that are equal to or in excess of the WBA.

(4) Wages used to establish eligibility for a claim cannot be used on a subsequent claim.

R994-403-102a. Cancellation of Claim.

(1) Once a weekly claim has been filed and the claimant has been deemed monetarily eligible, the claim is considered to have been established, even if no payment has been made or waiting week credit granted. The claim then remains established for 52 weeks during which time another regular claim may not be filed against the state of Utah unless the claim is canceled.

(2) A claim may be canceled if the claimant requests that the claim be canceled and one of the following circumstances can be shown:

(a) no weekly claims have been filed;

(b) cancellation is requested prior to the issuance of the monetary determination;

(c) the request is made within the same time period permitted for an appeal of the monetary determination and the claimant returns any benefits that have been paid;

(d) the claimant had earnings, severance, or vacation payments equal to or greater than the WBA applicable to all weeks for which claims were filed;

(e) the claimant meets the eligibility requirements for filing a new claim following a disqualification due to a strike in accordance with the requalifying provisions of Subsection 35A-4-405(4)(c);

(f) the claimant meets the requirements for cancellation established under the provisions for combined wage claims in R994-106-107; or

(g) the claimant has filed an unemployment compensation for ex-military (UCX) claim, and it is determined the claimant does not have wage credits under Title 5, chapter 85, U.S. Code.

(3) If a claimant is disqualified from the receipt of unemployment benefits because he or she was discharged for a crime in connection with work under R994-405-210, whether the claimant was deemed monetarily eligible or not, the claim will be established for 52 weeks and cannot be canceled even if the requirements of subsection (2) have been satisfied.

R994-403-103a. Reopening a Claim.

(1) A claim for benefits is considered "closed" when a claimant reports four consecutive weeks of earnings equal to or in excess of the WBA or does not file a weekly claim within 27 days from the last week filed. In those circumstances, the claimant must reopen the claim before benefits can be paid.

(2) A claimant may reopen the claim any time during the 52-week period after first filing by completing the application to reopen at the Department's website, or as otherwise instructed by the Department. The effective date of the reopened claim will be the Sunday of the week in which the claimant requests reopening unless good cause is established for failure to request reopening during a prior week in accordance with R994-403-106a.

R994-403-104g. Using Unused Wages for a Subsequent Claim.

(1) A claimant may have sufficient wage credits to monetarily qualify for a subsequent claim without intervening employment.

(2) With the exception of subsection (3), benefits will not be paid under Subsection 35A-4-403(1)(g) from the effective date of the claim and continuing until the week the claimant provides proof of covered employment equal to at least six times the WBA. Each of the following elements must be satisfied:

(a) the claimant must have performed work in covered employment after the effective date of the original claim, but not necessarily during the benefit year of the original claim;

(b) actual services must have been performed. Vacation, severance pay, or a bonus cannot be used to requalify; and

(c) the claimant must have earnings from covered employment, as defined in R994-201-101(9), equal to at least six times the WBA of the original or subsequent claim, whichever is lower.

(3) Intervening covered employment is not required if the claimant did not receive benefits during the preceding benefit year.

R994-403-105a. Filing Weekly Claims.

(1) Claims must be filed on a weekly basis. For unemployment benefit purposes, the week begins at 12:01 a.m. on Sunday and ends at midnight on Saturday. The claimant is the only person who is authorized to file weekly claims. The responsibility for filing weekly claims cannot be delegated to another person.

(2) Each weekly claim should be filed as soon as possible after the Saturday week ending date. If the claim has not been closed, the Department will allow 20 days after the week ending date to file a timely claim. A weekly claim filed 21 or more calendar days after the week ending date will be denied unless good cause for late filing is established in accordance with R994-403-106a.

R994-403-106a. Good Cause for Late Filing.

(1) Claims must be filed timely to insure prompt, accurate payment of benefits. Untimely claims are susceptible to errors and deprive the Department of its responsibility to monitor eligibility. Benefits may be paid if it is determined that the claimant had good cause for not filing in a timely manner.

(2) The claimant has the burden to establish good cause by competent evidence. Good cause is limited to circumstances where it is shown that the reasons for the delay in filing were due to circumstances beyond the claimant's control or were compelling and reasonable. Some reasons for good cause for late filing may raise other eligibility issues. Some examples that may establish good cause for late filing are:

(a) a crisis of several days duration that interrupts the normal routine during the time the claim should be filed;

(b) hospitalization or incarceration; or

(c) coercion or intimidation exercised by the employer to prevent the prompt filing of a claim.

(3) The Department is the only acceptable source of information about unemployment benefits. Relying on inaccurate advice from friends, relatives, other claimants or similar sources does not constitute good cause.

(4) Good cause for late filing cannot extend beyond 65 weeks from the filing date of the initial claim.

R994-403-107b. Registration, Workshops, Deferrals - General Definition.

(1) A claimant must register for work with the Department, unless, at the discretion of the Department, registration is waived or deferred.

(2) The Department may require attendance at workshops designed to assist claimants in obtaining employment.

(3) Failure, without good cause, to comply with the requirements of Subsections (1) and (2) of this section may result in a denial of benefits. The claimant has the burden to establish good cause through competent evidence. Good cause is limited to circumstances where it is shown that the failure to comply was due to circumstances beyond the control of the claimant or which were compelling and reasonable. The proof of inability to register or report may raise an able or available issue.

(4) The denial of benefits begins with the Sunday of the week the claimant failed to comply and will continue through the Saturday prior to the week the claimant contacts the Department and complies by either registering for work, reporting as required, or scheduling an appointment to attend the next available workshop or conference. The denial can be waived if the Department determines the claimant complied within 7 calendar days of the decision date.

R994-403-108b. Deferral of Work Registration and Work Search.

(1) The Department may elect to defer the work registration and work search requirements. A claimant placed in a deferred status is not required to actively seek work but must meet all other availability requirements of the act. Deferrals are generally limited to the following circumstances:

(a) Labor Disputes.

A claimant who is unemployed due to a labor dispute may be deferred while an eligibility determination under Subsection 35A-4-405(4) is pending. If benefits are allowed, the claimant must register for work immediately.

(b) Union Attachment.

(i) A claimant who is a union member in good standing, is on the out-of-work list, or is otherwise eligible for a job referral by the union, and has earned at least half of his or her base period earnings through the union, may be eligible for a deferral. If a deferral is granted to a union member, it shall not be extended beyond the mid-point of the claim unless the claimant can demonstrate a reasonable expectation of obtaining employment through the union.

(ii) If the claimant is not in deferred status because the claimant did not earn at least 50 percent of his or her base period wage credits in employment as a union member, or the deferral has ended, the claimant must meet the requirements of an active, good faith work search by contacting employers in addition to contacts with the union. This work search is required even though unions may have regulations and rules which penalize members for making independent contacts to try to find work or for accepting nonunion employment.

(c) Employer Attachment.

A claimant who has an attachment to a prior employer and reasonable assurance of returning to full-time employment within ten weeks of filing or reopening a claim may have the work registration requirement deferred to the expected date of recall. A claimant is presumed to have reasonable assurance of employment if he or she previously worked for the employer and there has been no change in the conditions of his or her employment which would indicate severance of the employment relationship. The deferral should generally not extend longer than ten weeks. To extend beyond ten weeks, the claimant must have earned at least half of his or her base period earnings with the employer in question and the employer must submit a request to the department.

(d) Three Week Deferral.

A claimant who accepts a definite offer of full-time work to begin within three weeks, shall be deferred for that period.

(e) Seasonal.

A claimant may be deferred when, due to seasonal factors, work is not available in the claimant's primary base period occupation and other suitable work is not available in the area.

(f) Department approval.

If Department approval is granted under the elements of R994-403-202, the claimant will be placed in deferred status once the training begins and will not be required to register for work or to seek and accept work. The deferral also applies to break periods between successive terms as long as the break period is four weeks or less. A claimant must make a work search prior to the onset of training, even if the claimant has been advised that the training has been approved.

(2) Deferrals cannot be granted if prohibited by state or federal law for certain benefit programs.

R994-403-109b. Profiled Claimants.

(1) The Department will identify individuals who are likely to exhaust unemployment benefits through a profiling system and require that they participate in reemployment services. These services may include job search workshops, job placement services, counseling, testing, and assessment.

(2) In order to avoid disqualification for failure to participate in reemployment services, the claimant must show good cause for nonparticipation. Good cause is limited to circumstances where the claimant can show that the reasons for the delay in filing were due to circumstances beyond the claimant's control or were compelling and reasonable.

(3) Failure to participate in reemployment services without good cause will result in a denial of benefits beginning with the week the claimant refuses or fails to attend scheduled services and continuing until the week the claimant participates in the required reemployment service.

(4) Some reasons for good cause for nonparticipation may raise other eligibility issues.

R994-403-110c. Able and Available - General Definition.

(1) The primary obligation of the claimant is to become reemployed. A claimant may meet all of the other eligibility criteria but, if the claimant cannot demonstrate ability, availability, and an active good faith effort to obtain work, benefits cannot be allowed.

(2) A claimant must be attached to the labor force, which means the claimant can have no encumbrances to the immediate acceptance of full-time work. The claimant must:

(a) be actively engaged in a good faith effort to obtain employment; and

(b) have the necessary means to become employed including tools, transportation, licenses, and childcare if necessary.

(3) The continued unemployment must be due to the lack of suitable job opportunities.

(4) The only exception to the requirement that a claimant actively seek work is if the Department has approved schooling under Section 35A-4-403(2) and the claimant meets the requirements of R994-403-107b.

(5) The only exception to the requirements that the claimant be able to work and actively seeking full-time work are that the claimant meets the requirements of R994-403-111c(6).

R994-403-111c. Able.

(1) The claimant must have no physical or mental health limitation which would preclude immediate acceptance of full-time work. A recent history of employment is one indication of a claimant's ability to work. If there has been a change in the claimant's physical or mental capacity since his or her last employment, there is a presumption of inability to work which the claimant must overcome by competent evidence. The claimant must show that there is a reasonable likelihood that jobs exist which the claimant is capable of performing before unemployment insurance benefits can be allowed. Pregnancy is treated the same as other physical limitations.

(2) For purposes of determining weekly eligibility for benefits, it is presumed a claimant who is not able to work more than one-half the normal workweek will be considered not able to perform full-time work. The normal workweek means the normal workweek in the claimant's occupation. A claimant will be denied under this section for any week in which the claimant refuses suitable work due to an inability to work, regardless of the length of time the claimant is unable to work.

(a) Past Work History.

Benefits will not be denied solely on the basis of a physical or mental health limitation if the claimant earned base period wages while working with the limitation and is:

(i) willing to accept any work within his or her ability;

(ii) actively seeking work consistent with the limitation; and

(iii) otherwise eligible.

Under these circumstances, the unemployment is considered to be due to a lack of employment opportunities and not due to an inability to work.

(b) Medical Verification.

When an individual has a physical or mental health limitation, medical information from a competent health care provider is one form of evidence used to determine the claimant's ability to work. The provider's opinion is presumed to be an accurate reflection of the claimant's ability to work, however, the provider's opinion may be overcome by other competent evidence. The Department will determine if medical verification is required.

(3) Temporary Disability.

(a) Employer Attached.

A claimant is not eligible for benefits if the claimant is not able to work at his or her regular job due to a temporary disability and the employer has agreed to allow the claimant to return to the job when he or she is able to work. In this case, the claimant's unemployment is due to an inability to work rather than lack of available work. The claimant is not eligible for benefits even if there is other work the claimant is capable of performing with the disability. If a claimant is precluded from working due to Federal Aviation Administration regulations because of pregnancy, and the employer has agreed to allow the claimant to return to the job, the claimant is considered to be on a medical leave of absence and is not eligible for benefits.

(b) No Employer Attachment.

If the claimant has been separated from employment with no expectation of being allowed to return when he or she is again able to work, or the temporary disability occurred after becoming unemployed, benefits may be allowed even though the claimant cannot work in his or her regular occupation if the claimant can show there is work the claimant is capable of performing and for which the claimant reasonably could be hired. The claimant must also meet other eligibility requirements including making an active work search.

(4) Hospitalization.

A claimant is unable to work if hospitalized unless the hospitalization is on an out-patient basis or the claimant is in a rehabilitation center or care facility and there is independent verification that the claimant is not restricted from immediately working full-time. Immediately following hospitalization, a rebuttable presumption of physical inability continues to exist for the period of time needed for recuperation.

(5) Workers' Compensation.

(a) Compensation for Lost Wages.

A claimant is not eligible for unemployment benefits while receiving temporary total disability workers' compensation benefits.

(b) Subsequent Awards.

The Department may require that a claimant who is receiving permanent partial disability benefits from workers' compensation show that he or she is able and available for full-time work and can reasonably expect to obtain full-time work even with the disability.

(c) Workers' compensation disability payments are not reportable as wages.

(6) Physical or Mental Health Limitation.

(a) A claimant who is not able to work full-time due to a physical or mental health limitation, may be considered eligible under this rule if:

(i) the claimant's base period employment was limited to part-time because of the claimant's physical or mental health limitations;

(ii) the claimant's prior part-time work was substantial. Substantial is defined as at least 50 percent of the hours customarily worked in the claimant's occupation;

(iii) the claimant is able to work at least as many hours as he or she worked prior to becoming unemployed;

(iv) there is work available which the claimant is capable of performing; and

(v) the claimant is making an active work search.

(b) The Department may require that the claimant establish ability by competent evidence.

R994-403-112c. Available.

(1) General Requirement.

The claimant must be available for full-time work. Any restrictions on availability, such as lack of transportation, domestic problems, school attendance, military obligations, church or civic activities, whether self-imposed or beyond the control of the claimant, lessen the claimant's opportunities to obtain suitable full-time work.

(2) Activities Which Affect Availability.

It is not the intent of the act to subsidize activities which interfere with immediate reemployment. A claimant is not considered available for work if the claimant is involved in any activity which cannot be immediately abandoned or interrupted so that the claimant can seek and accept full-time work.

(a) Activities Which May Result in a Denial of Benefits.

For purposes of establishing weekly eligibility for benefits, a claimant who is engaged in an activity for more than half the normal workweek that would prevent the claimant from working, is presumed to be unavailable and therefore ineligible for benefits. The normal workweek means the normal workweek in the claimant's occupation. This presumption can be overcome by a showing that the activity did not preclude the immediate acceptance of full-time work, referrals to work, contacts from the Department, or an active search for work. When a claimant is away from his or her residence but has made arrangements to be contacted and can return quickly enough to respond to any opportunity for work, the presumption of unavailability may be overcome. The conclusion of unavailability can also be overcome in the following circumstances:

(i) Definite Offer of Work or Recall.

If the claimant has accepted a definite offer of full-time employment or has a date of recall to begin within three weeks, the claimant does not have to demonstrate further availability except as provided in subparagraphs (B) and (C) of this section and is not required to seek other work. Because the statute requires that a claimant be able to work, if a claimant is unable to work for more than one-half of any week due to illness or hospitalization, benefits will be denied.

(ii) Jury Duty or Court Attendance.

Jury duty or court attendance is a public duty required by law and a claimant will not be denied benefits if he or she is unavailable because of a lawfully issued summons to appear as a witness or to serve on a jury unless the claimant:

(A) is a party to the action;

(B) had employment which he or she was unable to continue or accept because of the court service; or

(C) refused or delayed an offer of suitable employment because of the court service.

The time spent in court service is not a personal service performed under a contract of hire and therefore is not considered employment.

(b) Activities Which Will Result in a Denial of Benefits.

(i) Refusal of Work.

When a claimant refuses any suitable work, the claimant is considered unavailable. Even though the claimant had valid reasons for not accepting the work, benefits will not be allowed for the week or weeks in which the work was available. Benefits are also denied when a claimant fails to be available for job referrals or a call to return to work under reasonable conditions consistent with a previously established work relationship. This includes referral attempts from a temporary employment service, a school district for substitute teaching, or any other employer for which work is "on-call."

(ii) Failure to Perform All Work During the Week of Separation.

(A) Benefits will be denied for the week in which separation from employment occurs if the claimant's unemployment was caused because the claimant was not able or available to do his or her work. In this circumstance, there is a presumption of continued inability or unavailability and an indefinite disqualification will be assessed until there is proof of a change in the conditions or circumstances.

(B) If the claimant was absent from work during the last week of employment and the claimant was not paid for the day or days of absence, benefits will be denied for that week. The claimant will be denied benefits under this section regardless of the length of the absence.

(3) Hours of Availability.

(a) Full-Time.

Except as provided in R994-403-111c(5), in order to meet the availability requirement, a claimant must be ready and willing to immediately accept full-time work. Full-time work generally means 40 hours a week but may vary due to customary practices in an occupation. If the claimant was last employed less than full-time, there is a rebuttable presumption that the claimant continues to be available for only part-time work.

(b) Other Than Normal Work Hours.

If the claimant worked other than normal work hours and the work schedule was adjusted to accommodate the claimant, the claimant cannot continue to limit his or her hours of availability even if the claimant was working 40 hours or more. The claimant must be available for full-time work during normal work hours as is customary for the industry.

(4) Type of Work and Wage Restrictions.

(a) The claimant must be available for work that is considered suitable based on the length of time he or she has been unemployed as provided in R994-405-306.

(b) Contract Obligation.

If a claimant is restricted due to a contractual obligation from competing with a former employer or accepting employment in the claimant's regular occupation, the claimant is not eligible for benefits unless the claimant can show that he or she:

(i) is actively seeking work outside the restrictions of the noncompete contract;

(ii) has the skills and/or training necessary to obtain that work; and

(iii) can reasonably expect to obtain that employment.

(5) Employer/Occupational Requirements.

If the claimant does not have the license or special equipment required for the type of work the claimant wants to obtain, the claimant cannot be considered available for work unless the claimant is actively seeking other types of work and has a reasonable expectation of obtaining that work.

(6) Temporary Availability.

When an individual is limited to temporary work because of anticipated military service, school attendance, travel, church service, relocation, a reasonable expectation of recall to a former employer for which the claimant is not in deferral status, or any other anticipated restriction on the claimant's future availability, availability is only established if the claimant is willing to accept and is actively seeking temporary work. The claimant must also show there is a realistic expectation that there is temporary work in the claimant's occupation, otherwise the claimant may be required to accept temporary work in another occupation. Evidence of a genuine desire to obtain temporary work may be shown by registration with and willingness to accept work with temporary employment services.

(7) Distance to Work.

(a) Customary Commuting Patterns.

A claimant must show reasonable access to public or private transportation, and a willingness to commute within customary commuting patterns for the occupation and community.

(b) Removal to a Locality of Limited Work Opportunities.

A claimant who moves from an area where there are substantial work opportunities to an area of limited work opportunities must demonstrate that the new locale has work for which the claimant is qualified and which the claimant is willing to perform. If the work is so limited in the new locale that there is little expectation the claimant will become reemployed, the continued unemployment is the result of the move and not the failure of the labor market to provide employment opportunities. In that case, the claimant is considered to have removed himself or herself from the labor market and is no longer eligible for benefits.

(8) School.

(a) A claimant attending school who has not been granted Department approval for a deferral must still meet all requirements of being able and available for work and be actively seeking work. Areas that need to be examined when making an eligibility determination with respect to a student include reviewing a claimant's work history while attending school, coupled with his or her efforts to secure full-time work. If the hours of school attendance conflict with the claimant's established work schedule or with the customary work schedule for the occupation in which the claimant is seeking work, a rebuttable presumption is established that the claimant is not available for full-time work and benefits will generally be denied. An announced willingness on the part of a claimant to discontinue school attendance or change his or her school schedule, if necessary, to accept work must be weighed against the time already spent in school as well as the financial loss the claimant may incur if he or she were to withdraw.

(b) A presumption of unavailability may also be raised if a claimant moves, for the purpose of attending school, from an area with substantial labor market to a labor market with more limited opportunities. In order to overcome this presumption, the claimant must demonstrate there is full-time work available in the new area which the claimant could reasonably expect to obtain.

(9) Employment of Youth.

Title 34, Chapter 23 of the Utah Code imposes limitations on the number of hours youth under the age of 16 may work. The following limitations do not apply if the individual has received a high school diploma or is married. Claimants under the age of 16 who do not provide proof of meeting one of these exceptions are under the following limitations whether or not in student status because they have a legal obligation to attend school. Youth under the age of 16 may not work:

(a) during school hours except as authorized by the proper school authorities;

(b) before or after school in excess of 4 hours a day;

(c) before 5:00 a.m. or after 9:30 p.m. on days preceding school days;

(d) in excess of 8 hours in any 24-hour period; or

(e) more than 40 hours in any week.

(10) Domestic Obligations.

When a claimant has an obligation to care for children or other dependents, the claimant must show that arrangements for the care of those individuals have been made for all hours that are normally worked in the claimant's occupation and must show a good faith, active work search effort.

R994-403-113c. Work Search.

(1) General Requirements.

Unless the claimant qualifies for a work search deferral pursuant to R994-403-108b, a claimant must make an active, good faith effort to secure employment each and every week for which benefits are claimed. Efforts to find work must be judged by the standards of the occupation and the community.

(2) Active.

An active effort to look for work means that the claimant must make a minimum of four new job contacts each week unless the claimant is otherwise directed by the unemployment division. Those contacts should be made with employers that hire people in the claimant's occupation or occupations for which the claimant has work experience or would otherwise be qualified and willing to accept employment. If the claimant fails to make four new job contacts during the first week filed, involvement in job development activities that are likely to result in employment will be accepted as reasonable, active job search efforts.

(3) Good Faith.

Good faith efforts are defined as those methods which a reasonable person, anxious to return to work, would make if desirous of obtaining employment. A good faith effort extends beyond simply making a specific number of contacts to satisfy the Department requirement.

R994-403-114c. Claimant's Obligation to Prove Weekly Eligibility.

The claimant:

(1) has the burden of proving that he or she is able, available, and actively seeking full-time work:

(2) must report any information that might affect eligibility;

(3) must provide any information requested by the Department which is required to establish eligibility;

(4) must immediately notify the Department if the claimant is incarcerated; and

(5) must keep a detailed record of his or her weekly job contacts so that the Department can verify the contact at any time for an audit or eligibility review. A detailed record includes the following information:

(a) the date of the contact,

(b) the name of the employer or other identifying information such as a job reference number,

(c) employer contact information such as the employer's mailing address, phone number, email address, or website address, and name of the person contacted if available,

(d) details of the position for which the claimant applied,

(e) method of contact, and

(f) results of the contact.

R994-403-115c. Period of Ineligibility.

(1) Eligibility for benefits is established on a weekly basis. If the Department has determined that the claimant is not able or available for work, and it appears the circumstances will likely continue, an indefinite disqualification will be assessed, and the claimant must requalify by showing that he or she is able and available for work.

(2) If the Department has reason to believe a claimant has not made a good faith effort to seek work, or the Department is performing a routine audit of a claim, the Department can only require that the claimant provide proof of work search activities for the four weeks immediately preceding the Department's request. However, if the claimant admits he or she did not complete the work search activities required under this rule, the Department can disqualify a claimant for more than four weeks. The claimant will be disqualified for any week during which he or she fails to provide the information required under R994-403-114c(5).

(3) If the Department seeks verification of a job contact from an employer, the claimant will only be disqualified if the employer provides clear and convincing evidence that there was no contact.

(4) The claimant will be disqualified for all weeks in which it is discovered that the claimant was not able or available to accept work without regard to the four-week limitation.

R994-403-116e. Eligibility Determinations: Obligation to Provide Information.

(1) The Department cannot make proper determinations regarding eligibility unless the claimant and the employer provide correct information in a timely manner. Claimants and employers therefore have a continuing obligation to provide any and all information and verification which may affect eligibility.

(2) Providing incomplete or incorrect information will be treated the same as a failure to provide information if the incorrect or insufficient information results in an improper decision with regard to the claimant's eligibility.

R994-403-117e. Claimant's Responsibility.

(1) The claimant must provide all of the following:

(a) his or her correct name, social security number, citizenship or alien status, address and date of birth;

(b) the correct business name and address for each base period employer and for each employer subsequent to the base period;

(c) information necessary to determine eligibility or continuing eligibility as requested on the initial claim form, or on any other Department form including work search information. This includes information requested through the use of an interactive voice response system or the Internet;

(d) the reasons for the job separation from base period and subsequent employers when filing a new claim, requalifying for a claim, or any time the claimant is separated from employment during the benefit year. The Department may require a complete statement of the circumstances precipitating the separation; and

(e) any other information requested by the Department. The Claimant is required to return telephone calls and respond to requests that are made electronically, verbally, or by U.S. Mail. Generally, claimants will be given 48 hours, excluding hours during weekends or legal holidays, to respond to requests made verbally or electronically and five (5) full business days to respond to requests mailed through the U. S. Mail.

(2) Claimants are also required to report, at the time and place designated, for an in-person interview with a Department representative if so requested.

(3) By filing a claim for benefits, the claimant has given consent to the employer to release to the Department all information necessary to determine eligibility even if the information is confidential.

R994-403-118e. Disqualification Periods if a Claimant Fails to Provide Information.

(1) A claimant is not eligible for benefits if the Department does not have sufficient information to determine eligibility. Except as provided in subsection (5) of this section, a claimant who fails to provide necessary information without good cause is disqualified from the receipt of unemployment benefits until the information is received by the Department. Good cause is limited to circumstances where the claimant can show that the reasons for the delay in filing were due to circumstances beyond the claimant's control or were compelling and reasonable.

(2) If insufficient or incorrect information is provided when the initial claim is filed, the disqualification will begin with the effective date of the claim.

(3) If a potentially disqualifying issue is identified as part of the weekly certification process and the claimant fails to provide the information requested by the Department, the disqualification will begin with the Sunday of the week for which eligibility could not be determined.

(4) If insufficient or incorrect information is provided as part of a review of payments already made, the disqualification will begin with the week in which the response to the Department's request for information is due.

(5) The disqualification will continue through the Saturday prior to the week in which the claimant provides the information. The denial can be waived if the Department determines the claimant complied within 7 calendar days of the date the decision was issued.

R994-403-119e. Overpayments Resulting from a Failure to Provide Information.

(1) Any overpayment resulting from the claimant's failure to provide information, or based on incorrect information provided by the claimant, will be assessed as a fault overpayment in accordance with Subsection 35A-4-406(4) or as a fraud overpayment in accordance with Subsection 35A-4-405(5).

(2) Any overpayment resulting from the employer's failure to provide information will be assessed as a nonfault overpayment in accordance with Subsection 35A-4-406(5).

(3) If more than one party was at fault in the creation of an overpayment, the overpayment will be assessed as:

(a) a fraud or fault overpayment if the claimant was more at fault than the other parties; or

(b) a nonfault overpayment if the employer and/or the Department was more at fault, or if the parties were equally at fault.

R994-403-120e. Employer's Responsibility.

Employers must provide wage, employment, and separation information and complete all forms and reports as requested by the Department. The employer also must return telephone calls from Department employees in a timely manner and answer all questions regarding wages, employment, and separations.

R994-403-121e. Penalty for the Employer's Failure to Comply.

(1) A claimant has the right to have a claim for benefits resolved quickly and accurately. An employer's failure to provide information in a timely manner results in additional expense and unnecessary delay.

(2) If an employer or agent fails to provide adequate information in a timely manner without good cause, the ALJ will determine on appeal that the employer has relinquished its rights with regard to the affected claim and is no longer a party in interest. The employer's appeal will be dismissed and the employer is liable for benefits paid.

(3) The ALJ may, in his or her discretion, choose to exercise continuing jurisdiction with respect to the case and subpoena or call the employer and claimant as witnesses to determine the claimant's eligibility. If, after reaching the merits, the ALJ determines to reverse the initial decision and deny benefits, the employer is not eligible for relief of charges resulting from benefits overpaid to the claimant prior to the date of the ALJ's decision.

(4) In determining whether to exercise discretion and reach the merits, the ALJ may take into consideration:

(a) the flagrancy of the refusal or failure to provide complete and accurate information. An employer's or agent's refusal to provide information at the time of the initial Department determination on the grounds that it wants to wait and present its case before an ALJ, for instance, will be subject to the most severe penalty;

(b) whether or not the employer or agent has failed to provide complete and accurate information in the past or on more than one case; and

(c) whether the employer is represented by counsel or a professional representative. Counsel and professional representatives are responsible for knowing Department rules and are therefore held to a higher standard.

R994-403-122e. Good Cause for Failure to Comply.

If the employer or claimant has good cause for failing to provide the information in the time frame requested, no disqualification or penalty will be assessed. Good cause is limited to circumstances where the claimant or employer can show that the reasons for the delay in filing were due to circumstances that were compelling and reasonable or beyond the party's control.

R994-403-123. Obligation of Department Employees.

Employees of the Department are obligated, regardless of when the information is discovered, to bring to the attention of the proper Department representatives any information that may affect a claimant's eligibility for unemployment insurance benefits or information affecting the employer's contributions.

R994-403-201. Department Approval for School Attendance - General Definition.

(1) Unemployment insurance is not intended to subsidize schooling. However, it is recognized that training may be a practical way to reduce chronic and persistent unemployment due to a lack of work skills, job obsolescence or foreign competition. Even though the claimant is granted Department approval, the claimant must still be able to work. With Department approval, a claimant meets the availability requirement based on his or her school attendance and successful performance. With the exception of very short-term training, Department approval is intended for classroom training as opposed to on-the-job training. Department approval is to be used selectively and judiciously. It is not to be used as a substitute for selective placement, job development, on-the-job training, or other available programs.

(2) If a claimant is ineligible under 35A-4-403(1)(c) due to school attendance, Department approval will be considered.

(3) Department approval will be granted when required by state or federal law for specific training programs.

R994-403-202. Qualifying Elements for Approval of Training.

All of the following nine elements must be satisfied for a claimant to qualify for Department approval of training. Some of these elements will be waived or modified when required by state or federal law for specific training programs.

(1) The claimant's unemployment is chronic or persistent, or likely to be chronic or persistent, due to any one of the following three circumstances:

(a) A lack of basic work skills. A lack of basic work skills may not be established unless a claimant:

(i)(A) has a history of repeated unemployment attributable to lack of skills and has no recent history of employment earning a wage substantially above the federal minimum wage or

(B) qualifies for Department sponsored training because the claimant meets the eligibility requirements for public assistance;

(ii) has had no formal training in occupational skills;

(iii) does not have skills developed over an extended period of time by training or experience; and

(iv) does not have a marketable degree from an institution of higher learning; or

(b) a change in the marketability of the claimant's skills has resulted due to new technology, or major reductions within an industry; or

(c) inability to continue working in occupations using the claimant's skills due to a verifiable, permanent physical or emotional disability,

(2) a claimant must have a reasonable expectation for success as demonstrated by:

(a) an aptitude for and interest in the work the claimant is being trained to perform, or course of study the claimant is pursuing; and

(b) sufficient time and financial resources to complete the training.

(3) The training is provided by an institution approved by the Department.

(4) The training is not available except in school. For example, on-the-job training is not available to the claimant.

(5) The length of time required to complete the training should generally not extend beyond 24 months.

(6) The training should generally be vocationally oriented unless the claimant has no more than two terms, quarters, semesters, or similar periods of academic training necessary to obtain a degree.

(7) There is a reasonable expectation of employment following completion of the training. Reasonable expectation means the claimant will find a job using the skills and education acquired while in training pursuant to a fair and objective projection of job market conditions expected to exist at the time of completion of the training.

(8) A claimant did not leave work to attend school even if the employer required the training for advancement or as a condition of continuing employment.

(9) The schooling is full-time, as defined by the training facility.

R994-403-203. Extensions of Department Approval.

Initial approval shall be granted, for the school term beginning with the week in which the attendance began, or the effective date of the claim, whichever is later. The Department may extend the approval if the claimant establishes proof of:

(1) satisfactory attendance;

(2) passing grades;

(3) continuance of the same course of study and classes originally approved; and

(4) compliance with all other qualifying elements.

R994-403-204. Availability Requirements When Approval is Granted.

(1) The work search and registration requirements for a claimant who is granted Department approval are found in R994-403-108b(1)(f). Once the claimant is actually in training, benefits will not be denied when work is refused as satisfactory attendance and progress in school serves as a substitute for the availability requirements of the act.

(2) Absences from school will not necessarily result in a denial of benefits during those weeks the claimant can demonstrate he or she is making up any missed school work and is still making satisfactory progress in school. Satisfactory progress is defined as passing all classes with a grade level sufficient to qualify for graduation, licensing, or certification, as appropriate.

(3) A disqualification will be effective with the week the claimant knew or should have known he or she was not going to receive a passing grade in any of his or her classes or was otherwise not making satisfactory progress in school. It is the claimant's responsibility to immediately report any information that may indicate a failure to maintain satisfactory progress.

(4) The claimant must attend school full-time as defined by the educational institution. If a claimant discontinues school attendance, drops or changes any classes before the end of the term, Department approval may be terminated immediately. However, discontinuing a class that does not reduce the school credits below full-time status will not result in the termination of Department approval. Department approval may be reinstated during any week a claimant demonstrates, through appropriate verification, the claimant is again attending class regularly and making satisfactory progress.

(5) Notwithstanding any other provisions of this section, if the claimant was absent from school for more than one-half of the workweek due to illness or hospitalization, the claimant is considered to be unable to work and unemployment benefits will be denied for that week. A claimant has the responsibility to report any sickness, injury, or other circumstances that prevented him or her from attending school.

(6) A claimant is ineligible for Department approval if the claimant is retaking a class that was originally taken while receiving benefits under Department approval. However, if Department approval was denied during the time the course was originally in progress, approval may be reinstated to cover that portion of the course not previously subsidized if the claimant can demonstrate satisfactory progress.

R994-403-205. Short-Term Training.

Department approval may be granted even though a claimant has marketable skills and does not meet the requirements for Department approval as defined in R994-403-202 if the entire course of training is no longer than eight weeks and will enhance the claimant's employment prospects. A claimant will not be granted a waiver for training that is longer than eight weeks even if the claimant needs only eight weeks or less to complete the training. This is intended as a one-time approval per benefit year and may not be extended beyond eight weeks.

R994-403-301. Requirements for Special Benefits.

Some benefit programs, including Extended Benefits, have different availability and work search requirements. The rule governing work search for Extended Benefits is R994-402. Other special programs are governed by the act or federal law.

R994-403-302. Foreign Travel.

(1) Benefits will not be denied if the claimant is required to travel to seek, apply for, or accept work within the United States or in a foreign country where the claimant has authorization to work and where there is a reciprocal agreement. The trip itself must be for the purpose of obtaining work. There is a rebuttable presumption that the claimant is not available for work when the trip is extended to accommodate the claimant's personal needs or interests, and the extension is for more than one-half of the workweek.

(2) Unemployment benefits cannot be paid to a claimant located in a foreign country unless the claimant has authorization to work there and there is a reciprocal agreement concerning the payment of unemployment benefits with that foreign country.

(3) Unemployment benefits are intended, in part, to stimulate the economy of Utah and the United States and thus are expected to be spent in this country. A claimant who travels to a foreign country must report to the Department that he or she is out of the country, even if it is for a temporary purpose and regardless of whether the claimant intends to return to the United States if work becomes available. Failure to inform the Department will result in a fraud overpayment for the weeks benefits were paid while the claimant was in a foreign country. The claimant may be eligible if the travel is to Canada but must notify the Department of that travel. Canada is the only country with which Utah has a reciprocal agreement. If the claimant travels to, but is not eligible to work in, Canada and fails to notify the Department of the travel, it will result in a fraud overpayment for the weeks benefits were paid while the claimant was in Canada.

KEY

filing deadlines, registration, student eligibility, unemployment compensation

Date of Enactment or Last Substantive Amendment

May 1, 2019

Notice of Continuation

March 29, 2018

Authorizing, Implemented, or Interpreted Law

35A-4-403(1)


Additional Information

Contact

For questions regarding the content or application of rules under Title R994, please contact the promulgating agency (Workforce Services, Unemployment Insurance). A list of agencies with links to their homepages is available at http://www.utah.gov/government/agencylist.html or from http://www.rules.utah.gov/contact/agencycontacts.htm.